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Today's Features

  • Morning rain didn’t delay Shallotte’s annual Christmas parade, which proceeded down Main Street promptly at 10 a.m. Dec. 5.

    The rain clouds parted just long enough to allow the hour-long procession to continue as scheduled from Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse onto Main Street.

    “I think there was a lot of praying going on,” said parade organizer Cindy Babson with the town of Shallotte.

  • Calabash's Christmas tree lighting Dec. 4 was a life-size rendition of the cozy ceramic villages sold at Callahan's, the local store where the annual event took place.

    As holiday music played, townspeople gathered outside the gift shop to await the golf cart parade, which proceeded down Beach Drive and River Road to the delight of children and adults gathered on the sidewalk.

    Folks lined up for free popcorn from an old-timey vendor. There also were hot dogs, coffee and cocoa.

  • Last weekend, my wife and I decided to go to the local farmers market and pick some tomatoes. I had never done this before, so I didn’t really know what to expect.

    Once there, we grabbed some boxes and hopped on the hay wagon. There were five or six others onboard with us for the tomato-picking experience.

  • No holiday would be complete without a performance of “The Nutcracker.”

    But in Brunswick County this holiday season, that calls for tradition with a bit of a twist—performances by the newly formed Brunswick Ballet Company dancing nimble steps to a coastal version called “Nutcracker Under the Sea.”

  • SUNSET BEACH—Seaside United Methodist Church Choir will present its annual Christmas cantata in two performances this Sunday, Dec. 13.

    The cantata, to be performed by 95 choir members, is “One Small Child” by Tom Fettke, choir director Kathryn Parker said.

    A 12-piece orchestra, some from the Wilmington Symphony, is providing accompaniment for the performances set for 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the church at 1300 Seaside Road in Sunset Beach.

    The ensemble also includes a harpist from Southern Pines, Parker said.

  • The Shallotte Junior Women’s Club will present its second annual Stand Up For Charity benefit comedy show featuring comedian Bobby Collins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 2, in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

    Collins’ brand of humor is described as heartfelt and witty, engaging audiences with a “clever blend of characterizations and hilarious observations.”

  • For little ones wishing to receive a response from Santa Claus by Christmas, they’re asked to bring their letters to Santa of the North Pole Mailbox at the Museum of Coastal Carolina by Dec. 18.

    Scott Kucera, executive director the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation, which includes the Museum of Coastal Carolina at Ocean Isle Beach and Ingram Planetarium at Sunset Beach, says children who bring their letters by the museum by Dec. 18 will be able to have their letters sent to the North Pole and back, all in time for Christmas.

  • For Mary Brown, becoming a minister was a journey from a life of poverty, drugs and incarceration to a new life.

    That’s what led the West Virginia native become active in ministry in Shallotte and to move beyond her old life into a new one—starting a small church and providing inspiration to those in need.

    Two years ago, Brown started House of Deliverance Worship Ministry on Tryon Road in Shallotte, and although the church has a small number of regular visitors, she continues to do what she feels God has called her to do.

  • Winter is on the way. Autumn is fading. If you look around, you will notice the trees have shed their bright fall colors and the grass is turning brown.

    Birds are once again visiting backyard feeders for a meal. Christmas decorating is at a frenzied pace with everyone decking the halls.

  • Ask most folks about a plant at Christmas and they’ll mention poinsettias or Christmas trees. Both of those are traditional parts of our holiday celebrations, but neither usually sticks around much past early January.

    If you want a great Christmas plant that will do great year after year, consider what is now called a “holiday cactus.” These natives of the tropical rainforests of Central and South America boast colorful blossoms in shades of pink, red and white at the tips of each arching stem.