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Today's Features

  • I am always amazed at the work, time and effort given to the World Day of Prayer by women from each host country. This worldwide ecumenical movement of women from many faith traditions annually presents a unique worship service with a specific theme. The result is a celebration of unity amid diversity, both within the writer group and all who offer the service locally.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Hahn of Sunset Beach will celebrate their 66th wedding anniversary March 4. The couple was married at Maxwell Field in Montgomery, Ala., in 1944. They now have four children, nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Christina K. Neeley, M.D., of Leland, and Carl Delray Cayton Jr., of Leland. The bride-elect is the daughter of Jim and Frances Sullivan of Duncan, S.C. The prospective groom is the son of Carl and Annette Cayton of Aurora. A March 25 wedding is planned in Charleston, S.C.

  • Etta M. Little, wife of the late James (Jim) Little, celebrates her 90th birthday on Feb. 13 at New Life Baptist Church Fellowship

    Hall. She has three children: James Maurice Little (deceased), Christine L. Vereen and Thelma Faye Little; three grandchildren: Cheryl V. Luke, James Brian Little and Whitney Maurice Little; and three great-grandchildren: Alexander V. Luke, Jenna Madison Little and James Brian Little II.

  • STAFF REPORT

    “Zula Patrol: Under the Weather,” is the featured Sky Theater program for stargazers of all ages during March through May at Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach.

    Join the team from the planet Zula as they use the pet Gorga to collect and learn about weather here on Earth and across the solar system.

    Catch this show at 3 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays at the planetarium at 7625 High Market St. in The Village at Sunset Beach.

  • How did casseroles get to be so popular? Although it seems they’ve been around forever, casseroles didn’t really attract attention until condensed, canned soups came on the market in the ’50s. The casserole was an American staple during the Depression, when families needed cheap, filling meals to put on the table.

    Do we only make casseroles because they are convenient? Is there really any reason to make a casserole?

  • BY LAURA LEWIS

    STAFF WRITER

    SUPPLY—As James Bell ascended winding wooden steps with a boxful of food for a family in need, his wife, the Rev. Patricia Ann Bell, urged everyone to go ahead of her.

    Health problems have slowed her gait, and it takes her a while to climb stairs, she said.

    But when it comes to community outreach, the shepherdess of Lamb of God Ministries still gets around just fine.

    The newly ordained minister’s church doesn’t yet have a building of its own.

  • This pelican was trying to stay warm as it waited for the snow to melt Feb. 13 at the Calabash waterfront. 

  • Gardeners from cooler climates often wax nostalgic for that hedge of sweet-smelling lilacs or the stately rhododendron that anchored Grandma’s garden.

    Attempts to re-create these memories in the hot and humid climate of southeastern North Carolina are generally met with frustration and failure.

    Rather than lamenting over that which cannot be, let’s look at some of the wonderful things about gardening here.

    Winter blooms

  • One of the things that amazed me when I first came to Brunswick County as a permanent resident was the number of controlled fires that are created in our area. So, I decided to find out what these fires are all about.