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Today's Features

  • Dana Marie Stanley and David Alton Sisk of Raleigh were married July 18 at the Watts Farm in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The bride is the daughter of Dane and Mary Stanley of Shallotte. She was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    The groom is the son of David and Becky Sisk of Smithfield.

    The bridal party and mothers of the bride and groom arrived by limousine to begin the service. The bride and her father arrived by horse and carriage, and he escorted her across the bridge spanning the pond and to the gazebo, where the ceremony took place.

  • Aimee Flynn and Dave Long of Shallotte announce the birth of a son, Joey Colton Long, born at 9:54 p.m. Aug. 18 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 5 pounds, 11 ounces, and measured 19 inches long. He joins a sister, Brittney, 15, and a brother, Austin, 9.

    Maternal grandparents are Lisa and Lee Harris of Shallotte and the late Donald Lee (Joey) Flynn Jr. Paternal grandparents are the late Charles B. Long and Bonnie Ward of Nakina.

  • Holly Maggard and Jeremy Robbins of Boiling Spring Lakes are the parents of a daughter, Kaylee Jade Robbins, born at 9:05 p.m. July 31 at UNC Hopsital at Chapel Hill.

    She weighed 4 pounds, 2 ounces and measured 17 1/4 inches long.

    She joins brothers, Jordan, 16, Dylan, 8 and Nathan, 7, and sisters, Ashley, 13, Emily 10, and Emilee, 5.

    Maternal grandmother is Melanie Maggard of Winnabow.

    Paternal grandparents are Sheila and Johnny Grainger of Supply and Barbara and Keith Robbins of Winnabow.

  • Brandon and Camelia Frink of Ash are the parents of a daughter, Ma’Kenzy Zacaria Chae Frink, born at 8:24 p.m. Aug. 21, at New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

    She weighed 8 pounds, 1 ounce, and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandmother is Angela Williams of Shallotte.Paternal grandmother is Carrie Frink of Thomasboro.

    Great-grandmother is Nedrea Williams of Longwood.

  • There is likely no more potent a statement than one that begins with the words: “I believe.”

    Creeds are essential to our lives. They help us to formulate our thoughts, to focus on important matters and to empower our ability to change and be changed and to be transformed by truth.

    Creeds mark the starting point of our faithful responses, as well as the onset of possibilities. While they are not static or stagnant, they are also not so fluid as to be meaningless.

  • With family members looking on, Trenton Burney, a WBHS graduate and former athlete of the year, accepted a handshake from Vice President Joe Biden and a B.S. degree in administration from the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Co. on May 27.

    Burney is the son of Carol Ann Burney of Supply, paternal grandson of Ollie Beatrice Burney and the late Gaston Burney of Supply and maternal grandson of Macie and James Draughon of Supply.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—A historic church in this once-sleepy village is celebrating a 21st–century addition that literally was built on prayer.

    Next Sunday, Sept. 20, Little River United Methodist Church will consecrate its new 15,000-square-foot Life Center built in less than a year.

    Joan Moales, Christian education director and co-chair of the new addition’s week-long celebration that continues through Sept. 27, pointed out prayer has been their foundation.

  • You hear the mantra every year that “fall is for planting.” The cooler days and nights of autumn place less stress on the plants and allow them time to get roots established before the ravages of next summer’s heat.

    In fact, our soil temperatures rarely drop low enough to suspend root growth, so your new plants will be adding roots throughout the winter. If you’re like me and get bored easily, you’re always looking for new plants to add during this great planting time. I’ve included several for you to consider.

  • Some areas are having an excellent year for caterpillars, butterflies and moths. If you lose foliage from a deciduous tree this time of the year, it will not hurt the tree. The leaves have already produced plenty of food for the tree and they would fall anyway in another month.

    The main reason to kill these fall caterpillars would be to keep the droppings off the sidewalk or out of the pool. Any pesticide labeled for caterpillars would work. Be sure to use one labeled for fruits or nuts if you plan to spray something edible.

  • Many of my friends were talking about “Julie and Julia.” I got the clear message that I had to see that movie. Awakening on a Friday morning with an awful headache, I told myself that the perfect cure would be time spent in a darkened theater where I’d suspend any disbelief that was engendered by reviews that judged the film to be mediocre at best. Instead, I would focus on the story unfolding before me.

    If my headache disappeared, I’d give the movie an excellent rating. If not, I would still deem it time pleasantly spent.