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Today's Features

  • CALABASH—Wherever Mary Keefe goes, Buddy the cat often goes. If he feels like it.

    It’s been this way for the past eight-and-a-half years, when Keefe, owner of the Yardbird Emporium in the Low Country Stores complex, helped rescue Buddy and his two kitten siblings from under the store’s porch at 10138 Beach Drive.

    Mary took Mini, one of Buddy’s sisters, home to live with her. The proprietor of the former Martelle’s Flag Store took the other feline sister, Miss Kitty.

  • lpha Course set at Trinity UMC
    The Alpha Course, a practical introduction to the Christian faith, is being offered free to the public at Trinity United Methodist Church, 209 E. Nash St. in Southport beginning Wednesday, Sept. 14, through Nov. 23.
    The class begins at 6:15 p.m. and is preceded by an open church buffet dinner at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $5; free for first-timers.

  • When I spoke with one of my daughters about the treat in store for me, she got a case of the giggles. I told her that my friend Rita, who is a registered nurse, asked if I’d like to join her and her daughter plus another pal in viewing “The Help.” She felt that it would be a great venture to offset my increasing cabin fever. My daughter’s comment had me laughing. She said, “Isn’t that your first name these days, Help?”

  • Rainwater harvesting is the idea of capturing stormwater runoff, often from rooftops, and storing the water for later use. When we have heavy rains such as with Hurricane Irene, most of that water is diverted into stormwater drains or ditches and is carried away before it penetrates the ground. Rain barrels or more complex cisterns can be installed to capture runoff and provide water for plants during drier periods. Increasing development along with the drought has increased the demand on municipal water supplies.

  • Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Thanks to Charlotte Glen, horticulture agent, Pender County Cooperative Extension
    The most lethal pest of lawn grasses in our area is also one of the least well known. Called ground pearl or pearl bugs, these insects can be found damaging lawns throughout southeastern North Carolina. In yards infested with ground pearl, it is often impossible to maintain a healthy lawn since there are no effective treatments for this pest.

  • Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff N.C. Cooperative Extension, Brunswick County Center
    I like quizzes. I think most people do. I’m not talking about the “pop quizzes” given by Jr. High teachers when you weren’t prepared, but self-evaluation quizzes that can be used to help you decide how you score on a specific topic.

  • Italian bruschetta (pronounced “brusketta”) traditionally serves to test the new harvest of olive oil each year, but it’s also a great way to capture the flavors of those ripe summer tomatoes, fresh basil and garlic.

  • Lane closures set at local bridges
    The North Carolina Department of Transportation will have intermittent lane closures at the following locations:
    N.C. 133 at the Oak Island Bridge from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, Sept. 12-23, to perform bridge inspection.
    N.C. 904 at the Ocean Isle Beach Bridge from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, Sept. 12-23, to perform bridge inspection.
    N.C. 130 at the Holden Beach Bridge from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, Sept. 12-23, to perform bridge inspection.

  • Ten years later, Americans who vowed never to forget Sept. 11, 2001, have kept their promise.

    Ten years ago, the country came to a halt and American lives changed forever as terrorist-directed planes crashed into the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., and a rural field near Shanksville, Pa.

    Nearly 3,000 lives were lost that day, including 343 New York City Fire Department firefighters, 60 New York City and Port Authority officers, and eight emergency medical technicians and paramedics.

  • Gwen Grady couldn’t believe the cheerful patient she had met at Brunswick Universal Healthcare was more than a century old.

    That’s because Mae Smicklas, who turns 102 on Sept. 26, is youthful for her age.

    Grady, activity director at the Bolivia facility, recently met Smicklas when the centenarian was brought there for recovery after a recent fall.

    “I was just amazed at how sharp she is,” said Grady, recalling how Smicklas said, “No, I don’t need any reminders” about taking her medicine.