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Today's Features

  • April Reese Sorrow
    University of Georgia
    In a few weeks, we will have the chance to see a rare natural phenomenon: the emergence of Brood 19, our only 13-year cicada.
    “For 13 years, these cicada nymphs have been living below ground, awaiting their day in the sun,” said Nancy Hinkle, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

  • Whether dining out or just entertaining at home, it’s important to know and understand which wine to serve with which food. When dining out, don’t be hesitant about asking your server what wine would go well with your entrée choices. Some menus will offer wine suggestions to complement each entrée, and a really good wine list should include a description of the wine’s characteristics.
    Choosing a wine

  • Flea market set for April 30
    For the 13th year, the St. James Service Club is proud to present its annual flea market on Saturday, April 30, at Brunswick Community College in Supply. The doors will open at 8 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. This event is attended by hundreds of area residents.
    The St. James Service Club is a nonprofit organization dedicated to identifying and supporting the needs of the community through volunteer participation and fundraising. All proceeds from the flea market will be used to meet the mission of the St. James Service Club.

  • Safety seminar set for May 1
    The award-winning crime prevention and personal safety seminar, Refuse To Be A Victim, will be conducted from 1-5 p.m. on May 1 at the Comfort Suites Magnolia Greens, 1020 Grandiflora Drive in Leland.
    The seminar is open to the public and costs $35 to attend. Pre-registration before April 21 is required. To register, contact certified Refuse To Be A Victim instructor Rick Paxton at 805-2196 or e-mail rpaxton@safesurroundings.org.

  •  ASH—Life in Ash wasn’t always the way it is today.

    “This dirt we are living on was my great granddaddy’s,” said Leroy Carlisle. “He owned a hundred acres from Old Brunswick Road to the Whit-Ash Swamp. There were farms on both sides of the swamp.”

    Leroy’s grandfather built the house he grew up in the 1850s before the Civil War.

  • CALABASH—Nancy Pate clutched photos of her late husband, Allen, as she and other family members gathered in the parking lot of the Hurricane Fleet fishing charter.

    The Jacksonville resident was among three families who gathered there April 8 to personalize eternal reef balls cast of eco-friendly cement and cremated ashes in their loved ones’ memory.

  • Camp meeting starts April 17
    The Sonrise Independent Baptist Church and members will be hosting their second annual old-fashioned camp meeting in Southport April 17-21.
    The old-fashioned camp meeting was started for the “preachin’, practicin’ and promotin’” of old-time religion. Come and experience some old-fashioned preaching and gospel singing. Don’t miss out on the morning or evening sessions.
    Lunch will be provided after the morning sessions and dinner provided before the evening sessions in the church fellowship hall.

  •  The weather keeps playing tricks on us, but soon enough, it will be time to plant those beloved annuals. So what is the difference between an annual and a perennial? The biggest difference between the two is how long they live, when they bloom and how they develop their root systems.

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