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Today's Features

  • “O, my people! I will put my spirit in you that you may live, and I will settle you upon your land; thus you shall know that I am the Lord. I have promised and I will do it, says the Lord.”

    When I read these words from the prophet Ezekiel, I am consoled beyond belief. At first blush any of us might say this message is for the house of Israel, the chosen people of the Hebrew Scriptures. What has this to do with us? What has it to do with Lent?

  • Work by renowned raku artist Charles Chrisco is being featured through April 29 at Sunset River Marketplace gallery in Calabash.

    The art of raku is said to have originated in 16th-century Japan by a Korean immigrant who had settled in Kyoto and married a Japanese woman.

    Translated, raku means “great happiness,” a title bestowed on the early wares by the reigning ruler of Japan.

    Clay artist Chrisco knows the pleasures of raku.

  • PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

  • “To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel celebrating its 50th year of publication, was brought to the screen in 1962 in an Academy Award-winning adaptation and later adapted for stage.

    More than 35 years old, Christopher Sergel’s stage adaptation continues to delight and compel audiences worldwide.

    Thursday night, March 26, Montana Repertory Theatre will bring “To Kill A Mockingbird” to life at 7:30 p.m. in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

  • Spaetzle is a German noodle or pasta made by pushing a batter of flour, milk, eggs and salt through a special spaetzle maker or colander into boiling liquid—either water or chicken or beef broth—and then served as a dumpling with meats and stews.

  • Warm weather is here and summer will soon be approaching. In anticipation of warm fun, many local organizations are now accepting registrations for summer camps.

    Looking for something for your kids to do when school gets out? Check out the list below to see what opportunities are available.

    Research indicates students experience the “Summer Slide” in the months when school is not in session.

  • I’ve never been one of those people who got overly excited about native plants. We do have some wonderful natives, but some of our southern favorites like evergreen azaleas, camellias, gardenias and crape myrtle have all been introduced from other parts of the world.

  • Survival techniques for certain plants provide that they be dormant during harsh weather and they grow and thrive during good weather. Problems arise when the weather becomes similar to springtime conditions and the plants respond by initiating new shoots, buds, leaves, flowers, etc.

  • Continuing with the discussion of how to invite birds to your home, the first thing to examine is the concept of living screens.

    Living Screens

    Hedges and rows of trees screen off unpleasant views and reduce noise from highways. In crowded neighborhoods, they offer privacy for your backyard activities and they attract birds to your place year after year. Juniper, autumn-olive, dogwood, cotoneaster, or a combination of these, make good living screens.

    Open Areas