Today's Features

  • The GFWC of Holden Beach will once again present Blooming for a Cause, a charity luncheon, fashion show and silent auction to benefit Hope Harbor Home and Providence Home, from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, April 16.

    Hope Harbor Home is a shelter for women and children. Providence Home provides temporary housing for teens in need.

  • Hoppers are coming to church

    As part of their Southern Gospel Music Series at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Bolivia, The Hoppers from Madison will be appearing in concert at 7 p.m. Sunday, March 20.

    The Hoppers, one of Gospel music’s most acclaimed and awarded family recording artists, have just completed an all-new studio recording, “Something’s Happening” (Spring Hill Music). The new release, produced and arranged by composer and producer Lari Goss, has been in the works for nearly two years.

  • I can still smell the yeasty, sweet, enticing aroma of baking bread as the bus ride took us past the Wonder Bread Bakery in East Hartford, Conn. Probably a mile or two before we spotted the factory, the odors bathed us, encasing us in a comforting fragrance. It was far more than the scent of an irretrievable past. It was a reminder that simple things are not to be trashed. 

  • Learn the right techniques for handling, preparing, serving and storing foods safely during the ServSafe Food Safety for Restaurant Managers class offered in four sessions on March 21, 28, April 4 and April 11 at the Training Center in the Cooperative Extension building (Building N) at the Government Center in Bolivia.

    The four-hour classroom sessions will begin at 12:30 p.m. each day. Participation is required at all four sessions. 

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Bo Allena Ellis of Shallotte and Daniel Mark Jankowski of Supply. The bride-elect is the daughter of Cecil Allen Ellis Sr. of Shallotte and Peggy Hewett Alred of Graysville, Ala. The prospective groom is the son of Mark and Jennifer Jankowski of Supply. A May 14 wedding is planned at Ocean Isle Beach Park.



  • On Thursday, Feb. 24, a group of eight Brunswick County residents went kayaking down Rice and Town creeks.

    The morning started off cool, like most late winter mornings do, but quickly warmed up to feel almost spring. Their adventure began at the wildlife boat ramp on Gordon Lewis Road. 

    Don Harty, co-owner of Mahanaim Adventures, met the group to lead them on a guided bird watching/kayaking adventure down both of these creeks.

  • Use worms to turn your kitchen scraps into a rich crumbly compost that when added to soil will boost plant health and growth.

    Composting your kitchen scraps not only keeps them out of the landfill, it also provides an excellent soil amendment and natural fertilizer that will improve your soil, boost plant growth and increase plant drought tolerance and pest resistance. 

  • Nutrition experts agree that vibrant, brightly colored, whole foods are often the healthiest choices as wells best bargains in the grocery store. They tend to be nutrient-rich, meaning that more nutrition is packed into every calorie. 

    On the other hand, processed and packaged foods tend to have more fat, sodium, and added sugars (with bright artificial colors rather than natural goodness). These items also tend to cost more because you pay for fancy packaging and advertising. 

  • Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s nine Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.

    Monday, March 14

    Turkey a la King/gravy, mashed potatoes, collards, grape juice, whole-wheat bread/margarine, beverage.

    Tuesday, March 15

    Baked ziti/meat sauce, vegetable blend, pears, Italian bread/margarine, beverage.

    Wednesday, March 16

    Beans and franks, hotdog bun, coleslaw, peach cobbler, orange juice, beverage.

    Thursday, March 17

  • Everyone seems to like pizza, whether we eat it out at a restaurant or make it at home with family and friends. 

    Italian in origin, the taste of that bread-like crust covered with a seasoned tomato sauce, cheese and other toppings is irresistible to most of us.

    Early forms of pizza were most likely what we call “focaccia” today, since tomatoes didn’t become part of the Italian landscape until the 16th century. No tomato sauce, no pizza pie. The addition of mozzarella cheese didn’t come about until the late 19th century.