Today's Features

  •  The first time I had Steak Diane was years ago at a fancy restaurant. Popular back in the ’50s and ’60s, when and where it actually came about is unknown.

    New York City is probably the best candidate for the source of Steak Diane, but which restaurant was the birthplace would be difficult to identify. 

    The top culinary trend of that time was dishes that could be flamboyantly prepared tableside. I remember being really impressed with the theatrical antics arising from the flambéing of the cognac that was used to make the sauce.

  • Everybody thinks they want to be a vet—until they think about.

    I didn’t so much think about becoming a vet, I just was. Some say it’s a “passion” while others call it “pathology.” Either way, working and living with animals is all I’ve known since I was “knee-high to a grasshopper” as we used to say in South Georgia.

    Sure, it’s hard to become a vet and even harder to be one, but it’s the only thing I’ve ever seen myself doing.

  • “A canopy of moss-draped trees leading to the Intracoastal Waterway” is one way to define Gause Landing.

    Or how about “George Washington slept here”? Or “Hurricane Hazel hit here”?

    Jackie Stanley Varnam is among locals who grew up in the area just west of the waterway and south of Ocean Isle Beach, on Hale Beach Road running parallel to Gause Landing Road.

  •   CALABASH—Diners lining up in the Seafood Capital during a busy summer suppertime can see the good-natured debate and choices live on when it comes to eating Calabash-style.

    “This is it!” proclaims a sign and arrow pointing out Beck’s Restaurant near the corner of Beach Drive and River Road.

  • Fast-talking traveling salesman Harold Hill has hit River City, Iowa—and Wilmington—looking to con the townspeople into buying instruments and uniforms for a boys’ band.

    Opera House Theatre Company is presenting its third and final week of “The Music Man” this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 23-25, on the main stage at Thalian Hall in Wilmington.

    Based on Meredith Willson’s classic production, this local rendition plays at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday with a 3 p.m. matinee Sunday.

  •  The Democratic Party will kick off the last 100 days to the November election with a free old-fashioned family style picnic and political rally between 3-6 p.m. Saturday, July 24, at Brunswick County Democratic Party Headquarters, 1420 Old Ocean Highway across from Brunswick Community College.

    All citizens are invited to attend regardless of party affiliation. There will be hot dogs, hamburgers, ice cream and sodas. Eric Hunn and the Ambassadors of Dixieland will provide music.

  •  The Brunswick Town Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Boy Scouts of America Southport Troop 238 participated in the 12th annual flag retirement ceremony at 6 p.m. on July 4 at the BB&T flagpole, at the corner of Howe and Moore streets in Southport. 

    Members of the Boy Scout troop demonstrated the proper procedure of retiring a flag.

  •  They are everywhere. I see them glued to people’s ears. I see them circling cheeks. I see their containers stuck in belts and protruding from pockets. I hear their ringtones in the midst of worship services, concerts, graduations, meetings—despite the constant plea, “Please turn off your cellphones and pagers.”

    The disturbance is not simply that they are ubiquitous. It is a deeper issue. Electronic devices, cell phones in particular, are becoming—if they have not already become—an entry into an insidiously insular existence.

  •  “I told my mom that I’ll go to these classes, but if I don’t like it, I’m not going back,” Mark Sager said about the Communities in Schools Parenting Education Classes. 

    The father of a 10-year-old girl and a 9-year-old boy, Sager recently completed the 12-week program. 

    “After the first class, I became interested and wanted to find out more because what they were telling me made sense. I began to look forward to Tuesday nights. My daughter loved coming to the program as much as I did.”  

  • Renee and Andy Osborne of Ash are the parents of a son, Kyle Andrew Osborne, born June 4 at New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and measured 19 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are Bobby and Sandra Simmons of Ash.

    Paternal grandparents are Ricky and Donna Hawes of Ash and Wayne and Barbara Osborne of Old Dock.

    Great-grandparents are Clay and Katrina McCullen of Longwood, Bunt and Betty Simmons of Ash and Magdeline and Jinx Osborne and Sandra and Joseph Hewett