.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • I am not talking about lawn here; I am talking about keeping our gardens free of unnecessary chemicals, saving energy and capturing and storing carbon. Extra water consumption, fertilizers and pesticides routinely used to coddle gardens account for large amounts of energy use along with carbon emissions. There are many simple and fairly easy steps we can all take to save energy and capture and store carbon in our gardens. The cool part of this endeavor is that we will also be lowering our energy bills as well as our physical labor.

  • Josh and Emily Burcham of Shallotte are the parents of a daughter, Emma Ann Burcham, born at 9:45 a.m. June 29 at Betty Clemons Wemont Children’s Hospital.

    She weighed 6 pounds, 12 ounces and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are John and Juli Rhodes of Shallotte and Tim and Tommy King of Ohio.

    Paternal grandparents are Kimberly and Bobby Burcham of Shallotte.

    Great-grandparents are Emma Sonborn, Sue Sowers and Donnie Sowers, all of Ohio, Becky and Charlie Ray Singleton Jr. of Bullock, and Barbara and Johnnie Ray Gore of Winnabow.

  • Amanda Knight and Jared Berry of Supply are the parents of a daughter, Faye Elizabeth Berry, born at 2:23 p.m. June 7 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 8 pounds, 2 ounces and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are Michelle Bifano and Dennis Knight of North Carolina.

    Paternal grandmother is Tina Bowen of South Carolina.

    Great-grandparents are Sharon Knight and Dennis Knight of Supply and Joan Bowen and Nick Bowen of South Carolina.

    Great-great-grandparents are Leo and Louise Hewett of Supply.

  • When my granddaughter decided on a solo visit with the “old folks,” she likely had no idea what would occur. Neither did we!

    The ground rules were set by Grandmother Dear. First of all, the distinction was made between a visit and a vacation. It was clarified that visiting meant entering into the lives of the host family. Vacationing meant filling the time with fun things to do and see.

  • On Saturday more than 70 kids participated in the Kids Fishing Derby at the Oak Island Pier. The event was sponsored by the Oak Island Parks and Recreation Department.

    Kids were given awards for the largest fish, smallest fish, skinnest fish, ugliest fish, shiniest fish and most fish caught. Those who did not catch any fish were able to participate in a drawing for prizes. The prizes awarded included fishing rods with popular themes such as Cars, Batman, Barbie, Hannah Montana and Superman.

  • If camp is under way, it must be summertime at the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher.

    The state aquarium is just a ferry-cross over the Cape Fear River from Brunswick County.

    Summer activities on tap have included junior naturalists, animal keepers and coastal crusaders camps for children and teens (advance fees and registration required).

    Day visitors of all ages are offered a chance to experience the sights and sounds of “The Waters of the Cape Fear,” from freshwater streams and swamps to coastline habitats, to reefs and the open ocean.

  • Ticker (ID No. A008445) is a black-and-white male domestic shorthair. He has been at the shelter since June 17. The shelter’s adoption fees for female cats and kittens is $55, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV (feline HIV) tests, rabies vaccination and spay surgery. Adoption fees for male cats and kittens are $35, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV test, rabies vaccination and neuter surgery. The shelter, at 429 Green Swamp Road (N.C. 211) in Supply, is open to the public for viewing animals and adoptions from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

  • The moon has fascinated humanity since our creation. Since it is such a beautiful object in the sky, how could it not captivate one’s attention? We watch the moon as it waxes and wanes during the month as the sunlight travels across its face, illuminating its splendor.

    As a child, I remember the first time looking through a telescope to view the moon. I was amazed how much detail was visible in the eyepiece of my telescope. The moon was full and I could see mountains along the edge. It was not just a round orb but also a complex object full of features.

  • Just like the bottle of laundry detergent that screams “new” when the only thing new is the bottle, plant nerds like me love unfamiliar selections.

    One of the most enjoyable things I get to do is bring new plants to the area and see if they can live up to their billing. We brought back a group of plants from the J.C. Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh a couple of weeks ago and these will be added to the Brunswick Botanical Garden and the New Hanover County Arboretum as soon as they are large enough to withstand the rigors of growing in the garden.

  • Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7-14 days as soon as you notice the disease. Bayleton, Banner, Heritage and Daconil have activity against powdery mildew.

    Summer bug invasion