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Today's Features

  • A neighbor and new dear friend gave Hubby Dear a marvelous book that featured tales of the rural South, as spoken by those who lived in the early years when refrigerators and stoves, washers and dryers, microwaves and toasters were non-existent.

  • Are you a teen between the ages of 13-18? Do you enjoy leading and teaching children 5-12 years of age? Do you take pride in your county and want to find ways to help? Do you enjoy being involved with other peers that have the same common goal: to grow in leadership, citizenship, learn new life skills and share what you learn with others? Are you interested in growing your volunteer hours for college, job searches and scholarship opportunities?
    If you have answered yes to one or more of these questions, TiLT might be for you.

  • Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Tis the season for lists: to-do lists, gift lists, wish lists and guest lists. Unfortunately, most holiday lists lack time for regular nourishing meals and physical activity.
    Just when we need them the most, we are too busy for these basic healthy habits. Sadly, many people seem to throw “caution to the wind” during the holiday season and deal with the consequences in January or later.

  • Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    When most people think of bees, the first bee that comes to mind is the honeybee, but this bee is only one of about 25,000 species known worldwide. In the U.S., we have almost 4,000 types of pollinating bees.
    The honeybee was adopted as North Carolina’s state insect in 1973. Not a native species, the honeybee was brought to North America by settlers from Europe. Bees native to the Carolinas are solitary bees and not subject to colony collapse.

  • The local food movement is on the rise. I recently went to a sustainable agriculture conference and was introduced to our next generation of farmers. These young adults are a diverse group, full of energy and interested in implementing new ideas and techniques into the farming world.
    Nearly every aspect of our lives has seen a vast change over the last few decades. Yet the way we grow our food seems to be the one thing that has failed to evolve much at all.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Along N.C. 179 just south of Calabash, passersby were doing double-takes—and then stopping to double-check.

    Was that a giant tortoise they just saw moving at a steady clip near the roadside?

    Yup, it was.

    People braking for the spectacle and stopping to get a closer look on a recent Sunday soon learned it was just Sunset Beach resident Randy Gallagher taking a few of his eight tortoises out for a slow-but-sure walk.

  • Senior site menus
    Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s seven Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.
    Monday, Dec. 5
    Macaroni and cheese, diced ham, vegetable blend, orange juice, biscuit/whole-wheat dinner, beverage.
    Tuesday, Dec. 6
    Beef tips/mushrooms and noodles, spinach, applesauce, dinner roll/whole-wheat dinner roll, beverage.
    Wednesday, Dec. 7
    Barbecue pork, baked beans, fresh cooked cabbage, fresh orange, hamburger roll/whole-wheat bun, margarine, beverage.
    Thursday, Dec. 8

  • The sandwiches we eat today were named for John Montagu, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich. As the story goes, he was an enthusiastic gambler and didn’t want to leave the tables to partake of dinner, so he had someone bring him some meat between a couple slices of bread. It then became common practice for others to say, “I’ll have what Sandwich is having.” Eventually, it caught on and people just started calling for a “sandwich” when they wanted meat between two slices of bread.

  • CALABASH—Greenware is drying on racks as pottery artist Vivian Swanson, seated at a sketching table, etches a mermaid into a wet, flat piece of clay she plans to fire and glaze into a plaque in the near future.

    Janet Archambault, owner of this pottery-crafting place called Stay Centered Studio, shows off assorted creative-ware made by local ceramics artists, from glazed plates, bowls and vases to still-life fruit and face-masks, called “green men,” suitable for decorating trees.

  • Smart Start of Brunswick County has received a matching grant award from GlobalGiving for its Books for Babies in Brunswick County project.
    Books for Babies partners Smart Start’s Raising a Reader and Parents As Teachers together in a special project designed to encourage family engagement through literacy activities such as book cuddling.