Today's Features

  • Rainwater picks up pollutants from our lawns, gardens, roads and takes them into the rivers and bays. Rain gardens are a beautiful way to cleanse the environment of pollutants and keep our rivers and bays cleaner for its inhabitants, our cherished sea life.

    Rain gardens are raised beds in reverse. They are mirror images of conventional gardens that are planted high; rain gardens are concave planted in shallow basins. 

  •  There are probably more folks who associate “nirvana” with a 1990’s grunge band with a self-destructive lead singer than with heightened states of consciousness, but the concept of samsara certainly applies to gardening. 

    This “cycle of rebirth” in the garden means preparing soil well, adding lots of organic matter and learning to work within the constraints placed upon us by our challenging climate and, probably, killing some plants along the way. 

  • Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s nine Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.

    Monday, June 28

    Turkey Swiss steak/gravy, sweet potatoes, green beans, banana pudding, whole-wheat bread/margarine, beverage.

    Tuesday, June 29

    Roast beef au jus, brown rice, carrots, fruit cocktail, dinner roll/margarine, beverage.

    Wednesday, June 30

    Beef ‘n’ macaroni casserole, mixed vegetables, blend juice, sugar cookies, Italian bread/margarine, beverage.

    Thursday, July 1

  •  Olive oil has long been one of the most popular and healthy cooking oils in the world. This Mediterranean wonder has long been a top selling oil in America and throughout the rest of the world.

    Whether it’s used in cooking with sauces or used in dressings or just drizzled over fresh vegetables or pasta, extra-virgin olive oil, the highest quality of oil, has an acidity of less than one percent, according to the International Olive Oil Council.

  • The summer’s sky is full of many bright stars. The reason is simple: At the start of summer, the main plane of the Milky Way Galaxy is just above the horizon, and as the calendar approaches the middle of the summer season, the Milky Way’s main plane moves to the middle of the sky.

    More stars are along the main plane than below or above the plane; therefore, it is the position of the main plane that fills the sky with stars.

  • Artists from throughout the Carolinas, from the mountains to the coast, have brought their paintings and pottery to downtown Southport’s Franklin Square Gallery for its annual Summer Regional Show that opened June 21 and continues until July 17.

    This juried exhibition highlights the work of already well known artists in Brunswick and New Hanover counties and many others from throughout North and South Carolina.

  •      Visitors are invited to drill with Capt. William Dry’s Militia Company at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site on Saturday, June 19. 

    Al Denn will demonstrate 18th century apothecary and surgery in Colonial America and Albert Shaw will display Colonial weapons and demonstrate Colonial surveying.

  •   Communities in Schools (CIS) awarded $1,000 scholarships to 15 graduating seniors at all Brunswick County high schools during this year’s senior awards ceremony.

    Recipients were interviewed and scored based on academics, school activities, community involvement, financial need and interview presentation. 

    CIS partners with local businesses, industries, civic clubs, agencies, communities of faith and individuals to provide these scholarships.

  • Brunswick Community College recently had four faculty members intern at five local business/agencies as a part of its College Tech Prep Faculty Internship Program.

    The program helps faculty members gain firsthand experience with new technology, gives them the opportunity to bring new knowledge into classrooms and bridges the gap between the education system and the business sector.

  • I cried when I first viewed 99 power-packed minutes of “Wit,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Margaret Edson made into a 2001 HBO movie.
    I thought my tears would end with the final scene of the movie that tracked the last days of Vivian Bearing, Phd., a professor of English whose academic life revolved about the works of John Donne, particularly the holy sonnet “Death Be Not Proud.” But, I was wrong! Tears flowed as abundantly when I saw the film again, this time with my companion chaplains at Brunswick Community Hospital.