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Today's Features

  • London Gore believes in the power of prayer, even if it takes more than six decades to be answered.

    That’s what the 87-year-old Shallotte resident and World War II veteran had been doing all those years in hopes of finding the family of Sgt. Michael Dicky, his Army tank commander and good friend who was killed before Gore’s eyes during the Normandy campaign on Aug. 13, 1944.

    Credit Charlotte resident and World War II buff Jerry Evers for providing assistance.

  • The North Strand Sail and Power Squadron, a unit of the United States Power Squadrons and headquartered in Little River, S.C., is offering its America’s Boating Course in a one-day format from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, March 5, at Little River United Methodist Church in Little River, S.C.

    Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. with coffee and donuts. A light lunch will also be provided for all participants. The only cost is for materials; a spouse or friend can share a book.

  • Dosher Memorial Hospital, 924 N. Howe St. in Southport is sponsoring a drive-through drug and medication collection event from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 24.

    “Operation Medicine Cabinet” is intended to give residents in and around the Brunswick County area an opportunity to safely dispose of out-of-date or unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medications. In addition, Dosher will be collecting pet medications and used hypodermic needles as well, according to Dosher Hospital Community Relations Director Kirk Singer. 

  • “More Legends: Tales and Traditions of Brunswick County and Southeastern North Carolina” is the latest book published by local author Christy Judah.

    “More Legends” provides a personal glimpse into life on the coast from the Green Swamps to Rabontown, Exum, Sunset Beach and Southport...to Leland and all points in between where the histories of unincorporated community areas are detailed.

  • North Carolina Coast Host has named Karen Sphar, executive vice president of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce, as its Tourism Person of the Year–Southern Region. The announcement was made at the organization’s annual membership meeting and awards luncheon at the Courtyard Marriott in Carolina Beach. 

  • Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site will re-introduce two historical time periods when it presents, “Wanted: Preparing for War: the 146th anniversary of the fall of Fort Anderson and the 245th anniversary of the Stamp Act Crisis,” on Feb. 19-20.

    The site will open at 9 a.m. Saturday with three tours of Battery B planned throughout the day. Tour tickets are $5 each for ages 12 and older. Proceeds benefit the site’s gun emplacement project.

  • The Brunswick Newcomers Club (BNC) will meet Wednesday, Feb. 16, at the Southport Community Center, 223 E. Bay St. (between Bay and Moore streets) in Southport. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with coffee and refreshments followed by the formal meeting at 10 a.m.

    Mary Strickland, manager and curator of the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Southport, will talk about moving day for the museum. Sign-up sheets for various activities and trips will also be available at the meeting.

  • The Southport-Oak Island Kiwanis Club recently celebrated its 17th anniversary with a banquet at the Southport Community Center.

    Highlights included remarks from past Teen Court scholarship winner Samantha Schiff Fravel, who graduated cum laude in two years with a degree in political science from Pembroke University and will be entering law school next semester.

  • Light Ministries plans fundraiser

    Help the community by buying candy, flowers, jewelry, goodies and pictures at bargain prices in front of Hill’s Grocery on Main Street in Shallotte Feb. 11-13.

    Proceeds will benefit Light Ministries International Inc., an evangelistic mission-minded ministry.

    Hours are noon-4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11; and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 12-13.

    Marriage conference set

  • In his inimitable style, Hubby Dear announced, “We’re going to watch public television tonight. You like music. You’re going to love this program.” 

    My typical reaction, rolling my eyes in dismay and feeling pressured to like something I had not chosen for myself, changed to delight when the interview with Gustavo Dudamel began. It intensified with the following two hours highlighting his conducting the LA Philharmonic Orchestra. To say that it was a celebration is a major understatement.