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Today's Features

  • October is one of my favorite times of the year, as oysters, shrimp, crab and clams are featured at the many seafood festivals in our area. Shrimp, because they are so rich in food value, are the most popular of seafood products. But you can’t beat the oyster stew and clam chowder that is prevalent this time of the year.

  • The Thanksgiving holiday is all about traditions. Most American families usually have their own tradition when celebrating Thanksgiving, from preparing the turkey and/or ham, to attending the holiday parades, to watching the many football games on TV, or to just lounging around with many friends who have gathered for the holiday event.

  • The holidays are a great time to stop and reflect on the things that have happened over the previous 12 months.

    While the economy has struggled, 2009 wasn’t a bad year in the garden. Rainfall and temperatures were close to normal. We weren’t pounded by any tropical storms. So, what plants were the winners and losers this year?

    Two new Knock Out roses were released in 2009—Sunny and Whiteout. After planting several of each in different locations including my own garden, my initial impression of these proved correct.

  • For many, real Christmas trees and poinsettias are basic ingredients for a successful Christmas season; however, buying right and then caring for your trees after they enter your home is critical for the success of this recipe. Yes, poinsettias are small trees. Our goal is to keep the trees looking good for as long as possible.

    Christmas trees

    With a real tree, you can smell and feel its presence compared to an artificial one. The magic ingredient to prolong this feeling is water, whether the tree is cut or live with a root ball.

  • One of the most profound questions one can ask or hear is this: “Who are you?”

    There are days when I look into the mirror of life and am astounded at what I see. I stare curiously at an image I cannot believe is real and ask: “Who are you?”

    Who is this person who has reacted with swift and sure anger at a remark innocently made or a question naively asked?

    Who is this woman who speaks confidently of non-judgmental, unconditional love and then becomes perturbed when things do not go as planned?

  • LONGWOOD—For the fourth year in a row, trains are pulling into the station—the one encompassing the Grissettown-Longwood Volunteer Fire Department, to be exact.

    The department’s annual Christmas Train Show is set for 6-9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5; and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6 at the station at 758 Longwood Road.

    The annual yuletide whistle-stop at the rural fire station has grown since the first one in 2006, when a couple of model railroads were set up on tracks in a training room.

  • The Brunswick Beacon sponsored a "Taste of Home Cooking School" Saturday, Nov. 21, during which the crowd received numerous door prizes from local and national sponsors and learned some short cuts for tasty holiday dishes.

  • Falling stars are a beautiful sight, as they race across the sky. I hear the excitement in everyone’s voice as I listen about an experience people had viewing a falling star.

    I love to watch the show of falling stars. In addition to watching, you could, as the saying goes, make a wish upon a star and see it will come true. Personally, I prefer saying a prayer but not only as I see a falling star.

    One reason not to make a wish on a falling star would be a falling star is not a star at all but dust left behind by a comet.

  • Sweet iced tea is as southern as magnolia blossoms and chopped pork barbeque. It’s probably blasphemous to admit, but I, as a redneck southern boy, don’t like sweet tea. That’s almost as bad as admitting that I don’t particularly like grits. Even though I may not appreciate all of the southern cuisine, the leaves of a camellia are the source of green, black, oolong and white teas.

  • The time is here for planting trees and shrubs. Review your existing trees at this time. Damaged and diseased trees should be cut down, but we need to think about the value of trees in our environment.

    Trees help provide oxygen, keep our soils from eroding, and keep our yards shady and beautiful. Just remember, if you take down a tree, please replant one or two in its place.

    When it comes to planting trees, there are some vital steps that must be taken to ensure the tree you plant will successfully grow and provide years of shade and pleasure.