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Today's Features

  • “To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel celebrating its 50th year of publication, was brought to the screen in 1962 in an Academy Award-winning adaptation and later adapted for stage.

    More than 35 years old, Christopher Sergel’s stage adaptation continues to delight and compel audiences worldwide.

    Thursday night, March 26, Montana Repertory Theatre will bring “To Kill A Mockingbird” to life at 7:30 p.m. in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

  • Spaetzle is a German noodle or pasta made by pushing a batter of flour, milk, eggs and salt through a special spaetzle maker or colander into boiling liquid—either water or chicken or beef broth—and then served as a dumpling with meats and stews.

  • Warm weather is here and summer will soon be approaching. In anticipation of warm fun, many local organizations are now accepting registrations for summer camps.

    Looking for something for your kids to do when school gets out? Check out the list below to see what opportunities are available.

    Research indicates students experience the “Summer Slide” in the months when school is not in session.

  • I’ve never been one of those people who got overly excited about native plants. We do have some wonderful natives, but some of our southern favorites like evergreen azaleas, camellias, gardenias and crape myrtle have all been introduced from other parts of the world.

  • Survival techniques for certain plants provide that they be dormant during harsh weather and they grow and thrive during good weather. Problems arise when the weather becomes similar to springtime conditions and the plants respond by initiating new shoots, buds, leaves, flowers, etc.

  • Continuing with the discussion of how to invite birds to your home, the first thing to examine is the concept of living screens.

    Living Screens

    Hedges and rows of trees screen off unpleasant views and reduce noise from highways. In crowded neighborhoods, they offer privacy for your backyard activities and they attract birds to your place year after year. Juniper, autumn-olive, dogwood, cotoneaster, or a combination of these, make good living screens.

    Open Areas

  • As food budgets tighten, you often hear people claim, “it’s more expensive to eat healthy.” Smart shoppers know to look for fresh fruits and vegetables in season and on sale. They also know there are some super healthy produce items that are as expensive as they are tasty.

    Eat Right Montana suggests the following tips for stretching the produce dollar:

    Dried Beans, Peas and Lentils

  • Pauline and Elvin DeHart of Supply celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married March 25, 1949, in High Point. The couple moved to Supply more than 25 years ago when Elvin retired from Western Electric.

  • Contrary to our usual pattern, my husband received a book and I began to read it. A tiny bit of literature written by Henri J.M. Nouwen, it’s title drew my attention: “Out of Solitude: Three Meditations on the Christian Life.” These meditations were first given as sermons at the United Church of Christ at Yale University.

    I had just returned from undergoing an outpatient procedure with the lovely command to spend the remainder of the day resting. Resting! What a nice message and delightful gift, a treat that I would otherwise guiltily embrace.

  • CALABASH—Fried fish is already a buzzword in the seafood capital, but during Lent it takes on renewed meaning at Calabash VFW Post 7288.

    On Friday, Feb. 27, the post once again started cooking up its annual Friday-night fish fries that continue until April 10.

    “Welcome to our madhouse,” joked Trish McCormick as she and her husband, Bill, and other VFW volunteers toiled in the kitchen at one of the weekly Lenten fish fries March 6.