Today's Features

  • This has been a tough winter for cold weather wimps like me, and I have the chapped lips and cracked fingers to prove it. Yes, I know the former New Englanders are laughing hysterically and asking, “Would you like some cheese with that whine?”

    Some of our plants have, like me, struggled with the colder-than-normal temperatures.

  • Pruning rose bushes is intimidating to many gardeners but actually good for the plants. Becoming an accomplished rose pruner takes time and practice, but keep in mind it is hard to kill a rose with bad pruning.

    While there is a great deal of disagreement among rose experts regarding how and when to prune roses, it is generally agreed most mistakes will grow out quickly and it is better to make a good effort at pruning roses than to let them grow rampant.

  • Too many people understand newness as novelty. As a result, they are reticent to accept change in their lives. A “same ole, same ole” existence is good enough for them. It’s comfortable, soothing and affirms the adage: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

  • Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash is featuring “Barns of the American Landscape,” a group show of oil painters, watercolorists, pastel artists and photographers.

    The exhibit, which runs through March 25, includes oil paintings by Richard Dixon, Richard Kuhn, Steven Sullivan, Brenda Behr and Elaine Bigelow, watercolors by Roger Tatum and Janet Dixon, photography by Mark Hilliard, C.E. Smith and David Keener, and pastels by Rose Kennedy and Kevin Beck.

  • Before ever tasting shrimp and grits, I must admit I was more than a little bit apprehensive about it. Grits were something you only ate at breakfast with your eggs and ham or bacon, or so I thought.

    I love shrimp, whether it’s boiled, fried, sautéed, baked or grilled. But combining it with grits? “No way,” I said. Boy, was I wrong.

  • A giraffe next to an engagement ring? No, this is not a clue from a truly strange scavenger hunt, or two items from a strange shopping list. They are, however, two interesting star formations in the evening sky and are relatively easy to see.

    The giraffe is not a well-known group of stars; you may recall the group from the Latin name, Camelopardalis. The second grouping, the engagement ring, includes a famous star, Polaris. These two star arrangements have an interesting past.

  • Old Man Winter has been relentless this year, but I always know spring is close when I see the Amazoy advertisement in the Parade section of the Sunday newspaper.

    While there’s nothing particularly wrong with the Meyer zoysia grass plugs they are selling, there are better zoysias available now. Crowne, Empire, Zenith and newer selections like JaMur and Zeon spread more aggressively and maintain good to excellent color through the summer.

  • The Master Gardener info line is receiving calls concerning lawn fertilization and weed and feed.

    March is not the time to fertilize turfgrass varieties grown here. March is usually the time your local garden centers begin major advertising campaigns to sell lawn fertilizers. For the types of grasses grown in this area, make sure it’s the right time to feed your lawn. In general, the best time to fertilize a lawn here is when it is actively growing. That is usually May at the earliest.

    Fescue should be fed in the fall

  • I am always amazed at the work, time and effort given to the World Day of Prayer by women from each host country. This worldwide ecumenical movement of women from many faith traditions annually presents a unique worship service with a specific theme. The result is a celebration of unity amid diversity, both within the writer group and all who offer the service locally.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Hahn of Sunset Beach will celebrate their 66th wedding anniversary March 4. The couple was married at Maxwell Field in Montgomery, Ala., in 1944. They now have four children, nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.