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Today's Features

  • Do you hate it when you brown ground beef for tacos, chili, casseroles or spaghetti sauce and end up with large chunks that are hard to break down? Or maybe you just like it all chunky.

    When making spaghetti sauce, you’ll want to have the beef in small pieces, which gives the sauce a smoother texture and at the same time allows you to have meat with every bite. The same goes with chili, as it can be quite a messy food to eat with large pieces of ground beef clumped together.

  • STAFF REPORT 

    GRISSETTOWN—All things Italian will be celebrated this Saturday at Silver Coast Winery, which is staging its annual Festa Italia 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

    The event kicks off with master of ceremonies Dave “The Bopper” Overby warming up the crowd with Italian songs.

    At noon, Larry Tanelli and the Paisans will perform until 3 p.m., bringing their renowned tribute to Louis Prima.

  •  Beagle Bailey

  • Ask anyone about salt and they’ll tell you it’s bad for you. Well, they’re wrong. Salt is not bad for you. Your body needs it to function properly.

    What’s bad for you is excessive salt, or actually, the sodium part of salt.

    Americans consume an estimated 4,000-4,500 mg of salt a day. We only need 500 mg a day, and it’s recommended we get no more than 2,400 mg a day—about the amount in one teaspoon of salt.

  • Those of you who keep up with my ramblings via this great newspaper, radio or television, know I have a bit of Japanese maple mania. With more than 500 selections, it is easy to go a little Acer palmatum nutty.

    Even though my garden is pretty small, I’ve figured out a way to work in seven different Japanese maples—Bloodgood, Emperor I, Crimson Queen, Tamukeyama, Orangeola, Seiryu and Sango Kaku. If my Emerald Pagoda Japanese Snowbell continues to disappoint, there may be some extra space opening up.

  • There has always been a concern for runoff into our waterways. Water runoff may carry pollutants that can wreak havoc in our sensitive environmental estuaries and marshes.

    Dislodged particles of soil and water soluble materials, whether they are nutrients or other chemicals, can move across the surface of even gentle slopes and be deposited into ditches or canals ultimately ending up in our water ways. Buffer strips help to filter out most pollutants and can trap sediment or other particles from entering our streams.

  • If you haven’t purchased your daffodil bulbs for next year, you better hurry right now to the garden center to pick out some beauties for next year’s landscape.

    Daffodils are among the easiest, most affordable and pest-free perennials available. One requirement is daffodils need to be vernalized; that is, they need both the cold and the warmth to bloom. Daffodils require a short chill period as opposed to tulips, which require a longer chill period. Our winters are cool enough for daffodils, as we can see as they continue to come back year after year.

  • BY LAURA LEWIS

    STAFF WRITER

    HICKMANS CROSSROADS—Watching her dog, Margaret, snoozing on the sunporch last January ignited Marsha Tennant’s creative spark.

  •  BY LAURA LEWIS

    STAFF WRITER

    SUNSET BEACH—In trying economic times, the town of Sunset Beach is holding its own and in one instance doing better than last year.

    Town finance director Donna Rogers, speaking at the Sunset Beach Town Council meeting Monday night, said the town’s local-option sales tax is 26 percent higher in the first quarter than last year, while accommodations tax is a “little less than 1 percent” higher than the previous fiscal year.

  • BY SARAH SHEW WILSON

    STAFF WRITER

    She still remembers growing up in rural Brunswick County, raising a family and working hard for everything she had.

    And Bessie Hewett has more memories than most, considering she is possibly the county’s oldest living resident.

    The Supply native will celebrate her 108th birthday this month surrounded by generations of offspring, and she will even garner a mention on an upcoming broadcast of NBC’s “Today” show, along with other centenarians from across the country.