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Today's Features

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Imagine strolling the beach, when suddenly a nimble-footed troupe starts dancing on the sand.

    Such flights of fancy are reality at the Sarus Performing Arts Festival, which stages dance on the beach, downtown, at museums and other creative venues in the greater Wilmington area when the audience may least expect it.

    Site-specific performances take place in non-traditional and unusual locations, turning architecture and nature into playgrounds for artistic expression and community meetings.

  • Everyone knows mulch is a great thing to add to newly planted trees and shrubs. It helps conserve moisture, keeps the soil cooler and helps control weeds.

    As we do applied research and learn more about how plants respond to various practices, we often find out “what everyone knows” isn’t necessarily correct. Information generated by Dr. Ed Gilman at the University of Florida over the last few years is changing the way we think about using mulches.

  • Want to get a little more bang for the buck with your crape myrtles? Prune off spent crape myrtle blossoms to prolong the flowering period. This works best on smaller plants where it’s easier to reach the flowers from the ground. You may also prune bleeder trees such as maple, dogwood, birch and elm this month.

    Summer gardening tips

    Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7 to 14 days as soon as you notice the disease.

  • A July 9 press release from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services mentions the death of a Wilkes County resident is likely due to Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

    As noted by Dr. Leah Devlin, the state health director, North Carolina had 665 cases of RMSF reported in 2007. We are likely to see an upsurge of queries about ticks and tick-borne diseases.

    There are no magic fixes to tick problems but there are measures (both chemical and non-chemical) people can use to reduce tick infestations around their property and to protect themselves and family:

  • Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are the ultimate fast food for family and guests—quick to prepare and low in fat. But if you’re like me, they can be boring. You throw them in a skillet and then wonder, “Now what?”

    A magazine once published more than 50 ways to prepare chicken. I’ve since decided that figure must be closer to 5,000!

  • Thanks to the consideration of a dear friend, I received an e-mail suggesting I log onto a Web site that would give me information regarding an issue with which I have been dealing for a while.

    It was an article by David Brooks entitled, “The Great Forgetting.” My laughter was already bubbling up from a great humorous deep.

    Brooks gave a wonderful tongue-in-cheek description:

  • Savannah Dawn Medlin of Riegelwood and Matthew Ray Edwards of Winnabow were married June 7 at Town Creek with the Rev. Bill Altman of Wesley United Methodist Church officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arden Medlin of Riegelwood. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Edwards and Bonnie Edwards of Leland.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

  • Bill and Molly Cox of Carolina Shores recently enjoyed a celebration of their 50th wedding anniversary at The Surf Club in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., with more 100 family and friends attending. Festivities included a dinner and dance. Among those in attendance were their three daughters and spouses, Kathy and Lee Severson, Diane and Scott Himes, and Karen Houston, as well their nine grandchildren and many out-of-town guests.

  • People in Brunswick County know what it’s like to come home to flooded roads and damaged homes.

    Living in a coastal area, local residents have experienced the devastating effects of hurricanes and tropical storms.

    That’s why members of Camp United Methodist Church in Shallotte have opened their annual drive to fill “flood buckets” for the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) to provide aid during hurricane season.