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Today's Features

  • Bill Immen of Holden Beach just filed for unemployment for the first time in his life, but he’s still optimistic about the future. He says he’s entering a new phase in his life and career and is making sure he’s available for the next opportunity.

    Immen moved to Brunswick County from New Jersey 23 years ago as a machinist with General Electric. In 1998, he left his job for health reasons and soon started his own paint contracting company.

  • Have you ever wondered whether certain parts of foods can be eaten? When removing the broccoli florets from the stalk, have you ever wondered if you could eat the stem? (I have, so hopefully the answer is yes). Most foods must be fabricated in some manner prior to being utilized into whatever dish is being prepared. This often means breaking them down into their component parts.

  • The 29th Olympiad is over and everything can go back to normal again. Or can it? I’d even ask, should it?

    Is it a good thing to put an experience swiftly into a memory bank or, worse yet, delete it to make way for the latest, newest, most exciting adventure or challenge?

    I suspect we are too quick to move on and too slow to savor the moments of our life. I suspect the speed of our movements impede the power to be found in dreaming. And dreams are building blocks of progress that illustrates human capacity to grow and be transformed.

  • Addie and Matt Knisely of Bolivia are the parents of a son, William Collin Knisely, born at 1:19 p.m. Aug. 14 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and measured 19 1/2 inches long.

    He joins a sister, Kaylee Alyssa, 21 months.

    Maternal grandparents are Donna and Charles Wheeler of Shallotte.

    Paternal grandparents are Kristine Knisely of Canton, Ohio, and Bill and Beth Knisely of Oxford, Ohio.

  • David Clemmons and Krystal Clemmons, both of Supply, are the parents of a daughter, Summer Rose Clemmons, born at 3:15 p.m. Aug. 19 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and measured 21 inches long.

    She joins a brother, James Cameron Clemmons, 5, and sisters, Dale LaShay Clemmons, 4, and Trinity Leigh Clemmons, 8.

    Maternal grandparents are Carl and Patricia Wooten of Gate City, Va.

    Paternal grandparents are Dale Clemmons Sr. and Rose Clemmons of Supply.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Jennifer Marie Padilioni of Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Terry Ryan Grant of Calabash. The bride-elect is the daughter of Louise Nash of Montague, N.J., and the granddaughter of Marguerite Cox of Ridgefield Park, N.J. The prospective groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Jackson of Calabash and the late Kenneth Grant. A Nov. 8 wedding is planned at Beach Assembly of God in Ocean Isle Beach.

  • Angela Thompson lets her faith guide her, and it has taken her from her hometown of Detroit to Shallotte, where she has practiced family medicine for the past eight years.

    And now it has led her to something she never expected—a career as a gospel songwriter and recording artist.

    “I’ve liked to sing all my life,” she said. “I really started writing and performing since I moved here.”

    Recruited in her residency by Dr. George Saunders, she moved to Shallotte in 2000.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • OAK ISLAND—Mariah Brazil was on the lookout for a special dog.

    Grieving over the death of her mother late last year, the Oak Island resident scanned the cages of homeless dogs at the Brunswick County animal shelter, searching for a special canine companion to help fill the void.

    It took a K-9 to come to her rescue.

    Brunswick County K-9 Sgt. Tommy Tolley was also at the shelter. He overheard Brazil tell a shelter employee she just hadn’t found the right dog yet.

  • Our waste disposal sites are filling up and landfills across the nation are being closed at an alarming rate.

    At least 20 percent of the solid waste placed in landfills consists of yard and garden wastes such as leaves and grass clippings. One step we can take toward solving our waste disposal problems is to make compost out of our lawn and garden wastes.