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Today's Features

  • Fall means Farm Heritage Day at Indigo Farms.

    The annual event at the historic farm straddling the state line near Hickmans Crossroads is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 4. Admission is free.

    Learn about the old ways of life on the farm, with day-long demonstrations that will include basket-making, blacksmithing, gun-making, molasses-making, spinning, weaving, and a working 1920s gristmill powered by a 1915 Morse-Fairbanks vertical engine from Horry County Museum.

  • The cooler days of fall make for great working weather with the lower temperatures and humidity. For many who hail from colder climes, pruning trees and shrubs is on the list of chores, but our erratic fall and winter temperatures make heavy fall pruning a bad idea.

  • The trend toward cooler weather is welcomed by most of us, but some unwelcome insect visitors can accompany it.

    Polistes, or paper wasp colonies, are beginning to die out and some of the remaining workers (who will croak eventually), along with next year’s crop of queens, are likely to start bailing out of nests. The surviving queens will seek out some place to pass the winter and all too often our houses become the location of choice. There are several species of paper wasps, but the common ones are mostly brown in color with yellow stripes on their abdomens.

  • September through late October is a good time for dividing your spring and summer blooming perennials in Brunswick County and the Cape Fear Region.

    For the most part, flowering should be nearing an end at this time of the year. That allows plants to put their energy into developing leaves for next season. Roots will continue to grow through the winter and this will help the plant get well established before the next bloom sequence.

  • Novant Health, the nonprofit healthcare system that manages Brunswick Community Hospital, and Habitat for Humanity recently dedicated Brunswick County’s 23rd Habitat for Humanity home.

    Novant chose their sponsorship for a home for Chowan Simmons and her five children to celebrate the Novant Health’s 10th anniversary and Brunswick Community Hospital’s 30th anniversary.

  • VARNAMTOWN—Varnamtown celebrated its 20th anniversary as an incorporated town Saturday.

    Mayor Judy Galloway said the town has accomplished a lot in its 20 years, including the building of Jesse R. Caison Park, installation of streetlights and Christmas lights, a new town hall and construction of the town boat ramp and parking.

    “None of this would have happened if we would not have incorporated,” she said.

    State Sen. R.C. Soles helped the town with its incorporation in 1988 and was invited to Saturday’s celebration.

  • SUPPLY—The Brunswick Beacon team correctly spelled “aficionado” and “doppelganger” to win the Brunswick Literacy Council’s Adult Spelling Bee last Thursday night.

    The two-person team consisting of Beacon reporters Kathryn Jacewicz and Laura Lewis won a traveling trophy and plaque at the annual spelling bee Sept. 25 at Brunswick Community College.

  • GRISSETTOWN—For nearly 30 years, Helen Lund had been feeding a colony of feral cats behind a building on U.S. 17.

    Using her own money, Lund would trap the cats and pay a veterinarian to have them spayed or neutered and treated for rabies before releasing them back into the wild.

    She bought medicine to treat the wild felines for assorted illnesses and eye problems.

    She erected houses for them on the feral colony site on a vacant lot behind a Dumpster.

    Sometimes, she’d take a cat or kitten home where she would tame it into a pet of her own.

  • “Give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he’ll eat for a lifetime,” asserts an old Chinese proverb.

    Well, not quite. There’s one more step. You also have to teach the man how to cook the fish.

    The general rule of thumb for cooking fish is: Lean, white flesh fish is best suited to poaching, sauting, pan frying and deep frying; fatty fish is best with dry cooking methods such as grilling and broiling, and moderately fatty fish is amenable to most cooking methods with the possible exception of deep frying.

  • Two weeks ago, I was graced with an abundance of spiritual opportunities. I eagerly accepted the gift, despite the fact both invitations demanded an early departure from my somewhat leisurely Friday and Saturday schedules.

    At the time, I doubt I considered the offerings to be a call from God. I was simply responding to the graciousness of others. Upon reflection, the response was clearly not the whole story.