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Today's Features

  • Life has taken many a twisted turn since the beginning of my bout with a variety of major health issues, particularly in the past two years.
    Frustration, a degree of desperation, fear...terrible fear...and an assault on what now appeared to be quite fragile faith. Unknowingly, I had entered the dark night of the soul. It was not a conscious choice, but it surely was one that dramatically changed my life.

  • Camp UMC plans Easter services
    Easter celebrations begin at Camp United Methodist Church of Shallotte on Sunday, April 24, with a 6:30 a.m. Sunrise Service. The Rev. Richard Vaughan will preach on “He Saw and He Believed” from John 20:1-8.
    The 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. services will be taken from Matthew 28:1-8 with a sermon titled “Ta Da!” All services will be in the sanctuary.

  • VFW president coming to N.C.
    Cortina Barnes, national president to the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), will be visiting North Carolina May 15-17 and will be hosted by the Ladies Auxiliary to the VFW Post 7288 in Calabash.
    Barnes will arrive at Wilmington International Airport on May 15 where she will be greeted by the Ladies Auxiliary President Janice Butterworth, department line officers and auxiliary members. Lunch will be hosted at the Wilmington VFW Post #2573 at noon and dinner will be at 7 p.m. at Post 7288 in Calabash.

  • A gentleman walked into the Extension office with a sample of a compacta holly that was struggling to survive. I immediately suspected it could be root-knot nematodes because compacta hollies are extremely susceptible to this roundworm. He collected a sample, sent it to the NCDA and sure enough, his soil tested positive for nematodes.
    Soils usually contain many free-living, or non-plant-parasitic, as well as plant-parasitic nematodes. Often, several genera of plant parasites are present in the same soil, though only one or two may cause major plant damage.

  • In an effort to cut grocery costs, help the family budget and take advantage of fresh, local foods, more people are turning to food preservation this summer. Many people are digging out long-neglected equipment and recipes to do-it-themselves.
    The advantages of home canning are lost when inappropriate or unsafe equipment or procedures are used. Why risk the loss of time and produce and possibly make yourself or a family member sick by using an unsafe gauge or out-of-date or untested recipes or procedures?

  • April Reese Sorrow
    University of Georgia
    In a few weeks, we will have the chance to see a rare natural phenomenon: the emergence of Brood 19, our only 13-year cicada.
    “For 13 years, these cicada nymphs have been living below ground, awaiting their day in the sun,” said Nancy Hinkle, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

  • Whether dining out or just entertaining at home, it’s important to know and understand which wine to serve with which food. When dining out, don’t be hesitant about asking your server what wine would go well with your entrée choices. Some menus will offer wine suggestions to complement each entrée, and a really good wine list should include a description of the wine’s characteristics.
    Choosing a wine

  • Flea market set for April 30
    For the 13th year, the St. James Service Club is proud to present its annual flea market on Saturday, April 30, at Brunswick Community College in Supply. The doors will open at 8 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. This event is attended by hundreds of area residents.
    The St. James Service Club is a nonprofit organization dedicated to identifying and supporting the needs of the community through volunteer participation and fundraising. All proceeds from the flea market will be used to meet the mission of the St. James Service Club.

  • Safety seminar set for May 1
    The award-winning crime prevention and personal safety seminar, Refuse To Be A Victim, will be conducted from 1-5 p.m. on May 1 at the Comfort Suites Magnolia Greens, 1020 Grandiflora Drive in Leland.
    The seminar is open to the public and costs $35 to attend. Pre-registration before April 21 is required. To register, contact certified Refuse To Be A Victim instructor Rick Paxton at 805-2196 or e-mail rpaxton@safesurroundings.org.

  •  ASH—Life in Ash wasn’t always the way it is today.

    “This dirt we are living on was my great granddaddy’s,” said Leroy Carlisle. “He owned a hundred acres from Old Brunswick Road to the Whit-Ash Swamp. There were farms on both sides of the swamp.”

    Leroy’s grandfather built the house he grew up in the 1850s before the Civil War.