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Today's Features

  • Pastor Skip Williams’ sermon will be “On Heart and Hand,” based on scripture from Psalm 119 and Matthew 5:17-20, on Sunday, Aug. 10, at Trinity United Methodist Church, at 209 East Nash St. in Southport.

    There will be a casual worship service at 8:30 a.m., a contemporary service at 9:40 a.m. in Murrow Hall with the Trinity Worship Band and a traditional worship service in the sanctuary at 11 a.m.

    Nursery care will be available during the 8:30 a.m., 9:40 a.m. and 11 a.m. services.

  • Chris and Leighanne Smith of Shallotte are the parents of a son, James Grady Smith, born at 12:52 p.m., July 10 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 13 ounces and measured 23 inches long.

    He joins brothers Justin, 11, Ben, 7, Ashton, 6, and Alyssa, 4.

    Maternal grandparents are Gloria Walter of Bladenboro and Grady and Sandra Tatum of Bladenboro.

    Paternal grandparents are Baxter and Sheila Smith of Garland and Debbie and Jim Pait of Elizabethtown.

    Great-grandparents are Harry and Becky Walter of Lumberton.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Beauty on Saturday night was definitely in the eyes of the beholders—the audience and judges who attended a womanless pageant, that is.

    Staged at North Myrtle Beach High School, the first Kayla Marie Bennett Memorial Scholarship Womanless Beauty Pageant drew 22 “lovely” males who gussied up and strutted their stuff for the fundraiser.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Imagine strolling the beach, when suddenly a nimble-footed troupe starts dancing on the sand.

    Such flights of fancy are reality at the Sarus Performing Arts Festival, which stages dance on the beach, downtown, at museums and other creative venues in the greater Wilmington area when the audience may least expect it.

    Site-specific performances take place in non-traditional and unusual locations, turning architecture and nature into playgrounds for artistic expression and community meetings.

  • Everyone knows mulch is a great thing to add to newly planted trees and shrubs. It helps conserve moisture, keeps the soil cooler and helps control weeds.

    As we do applied research and learn more about how plants respond to various practices, we often find out “what everyone knows” isn’t necessarily correct. Information generated by Dr. Ed Gilman at the University of Florida over the last few years is changing the way we think about using mulches.

  • Want to get a little more bang for the buck with your crape myrtles? Prune off spent crape myrtle blossoms to prolong the flowering period. This works best on smaller plants where it’s easier to reach the flowers from the ground. You may also prune bleeder trees such as maple, dogwood, birch and elm this month.

    Summer gardening tips

    Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7 to 14 days as soon as you notice the disease.

  • A July 9 press release from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services mentions the death of a Wilkes County resident is likely due to Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

    As noted by Dr. Leah Devlin, the state health director, North Carolina had 665 cases of RMSF reported in 2007. We are likely to see an upsurge of queries about ticks and tick-borne diseases.

    There are no magic fixes to tick problems but there are measures (both chemical and non-chemical) people can use to reduce tick infestations around their property and to protect themselves and family:

  • Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are the ultimate fast food for family and guests—quick to prepare and low in fat. But if you’re like me, they can be boring. You throw them in a skillet and then wonder, “Now what?”

    A magazine once published more than 50 ways to prepare chicken. I’ve since decided that figure must be closer to 5,000!

  • Thanks to the consideration of a dear friend, I received an e-mail suggesting I log onto a Web site that would give me information regarding an issue with which I have been dealing for a while.

    It was an article by David Brooks entitled, “The Great Forgetting.” My laughter was already bubbling up from a great humorous deep.

    Brooks gave a wonderful tongue-in-cheek description: