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Today's Features

  • As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.

  • Fried green tomatoes are one of my favorite summer foods. If you haven’t tried them, you’re in for a treat.

    Native to Mexico and Central America, it’s not clear how tomatoes came to the United States. Thomas Jefferson grew them in the 1780s and credited one of his neighbors with the introduction, but Harriott Pinckney Horry recorded a recipe, “To Keep Tomatoes for Winter Use” in 1770.

  • The admonition found in Galatians 6:2 is one exhilarating and exhausting. It is, at once, a consolation and a challenge.

    We read, and hopefully heed, the words of St. Paul, “Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the laws of Christ.”

    The same command and commission can be found in the Torah, which demands the people of God seek the welfare of the whole human community. It is present in the five pillars of Islam, in the practices of Hinduism and in the eightfold path of Buddhism.

  • Pastor Skip Williams’ sermon will be “On Heart and Hand,” based on scripture from Psalm 119 and Matthew 5:17-20, on Sunday, Aug. 10, at Trinity United Methodist Church, at 209 East Nash St. in Southport.

    There will be a casual worship service at 8:30 a.m., a contemporary service at 9:40 a.m. in Murrow Hall with the Trinity Worship Band and a traditional worship service in the sanctuary at 11 a.m.

    Nursery care will be available during the 8:30 a.m., 9:40 a.m. and 11 a.m. services.

  • Chris and Leighanne Smith of Shallotte are the parents of a son, James Grady Smith, born at 12:52 p.m., July 10 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 13 ounces and measured 23 inches long.

    He joins brothers Justin, 11, Ben, 7, Ashton, 6, and Alyssa, 4.

    Maternal grandparents are Gloria Walter of Bladenboro and Grady and Sandra Tatum of Bladenboro.

    Paternal grandparents are Baxter and Sheila Smith of Garland and Debbie and Jim Pait of Elizabethtown.

    Great-grandparents are Harry and Becky Walter of Lumberton.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Beauty on Saturday night was definitely in the eyes of the beholders—the audience and judges who attended a womanless pageant, that is.

    Staged at North Myrtle Beach High School, the first Kayla Marie Bennett Memorial Scholarship Womanless Beauty Pageant drew 22 “lovely” males who gussied up and strutted their stuff for the fundraiser.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Imagine strolling the beach, when suddenly a nimble-footed troupe starts dancing on the sand.

    Such flights of fancy are reality at the Sarus Performing Arts Festival, which stages dance on the beach, downtown, at museums and other creative venues in the greater Wilmington area when the audience may least expect it.

    Site-specific performances take place in non-traditional and unusual locations, turning architecture and nature into playgrounds for artistic expression and community meetings.

  • Everyone knows mulch is a great thing to add to newly planted trees and shrubs. It helps conserve moisture, keeps the soil cooler and helps control weeds.

    As we do applied research and learn more about how plants respond to various practices, we often find out “what everyone knows” isn’t necessarily correct. Information generated by Dr. Ed Gilman at the University of Florida over the last few years is changing the way we think about using mulches.

  • Want to get a little more bang for the buck with your crape myrtles? Prune off spent crape myrtle blossoms to prolong the flowering period. This works best on smaller plants where it’s easier to reach the flowers from the ground. You may also prune bleeder trees such as maple, dogwood, birch and elm this month.

    Summer gardening tips

    Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7 to 14 days as soon as you notice the disease.