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Today's Features

  • A July 9 press release from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services mentions the death of a Wilkes County resident is likely due to Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

    As noted by Dr. Leah Devlin, the state health director, North Carolina had 665 cases of RMSF reported in 2007. We are likely to see an upsurge of queries about ticks and tick-borne diseases.

    There are no magic fixes to tick problems but there are measures (both chemical and non-chemical) people can use to reduce tick infestations around their property and to protect themselves and family:

  • Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are the ultimate fast food for family and guests—quick to prepare and low in fat. But if you’re like me, they can be boring. You throw them in a skillet and then wonder, “Now what?”

    A magazine once published more than 50 ways to prepare chicken. I’ve since decided that figure must be closer to 5,000!

  • Thanks to the consideration of a dear friend, I received an e-mail suggesting I log onto a Web site that would give me information regarding an issue with which I have been dealing for a while.

    It was an article by David Brooks entitled, “The Great Forgetting.” My laughter was already bubbling up from a great humorous deep.

    Brooks gave a wonderful tongue-in-cheek description:

  • Savannah Dawn Medlin of Riegelwood and Matthew Ray Edwards of Winnabow were married June 7 at Town Creek with the Rev. Bill Altman of Wesley United Methodist Church officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arden Medlin of Riegelwood. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Edwards and Bonnie Edwards of Leland.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

  • Bill and Molly Cox of Carolina Shores recently enjoyed a celebration of their 50th wedding anniversary at The Surf Club in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., with more 100 family and friends attending. Festivities included a dinner and dance. Among those in attendance were their three daughters and spouses, Kathy and Lee Severson, Diane and Scott Himes, and Karen Houston, as well their nine grandchildren and many out-of-town guests.

  • People in Brunswick County know what it’s like to come home to flooded roads and damaged homes.

    Living in a coastal area, local residents have experienced the devastating effects of hurricanes and tropical storms.

    That’s why members of Camp United Methodist Church in Shallotte have opened their annual drive to fill “flood buckets” for the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) to provide aid during hurricane season.

  • When their 5-month-old son, Stephen, was diagnosed with infantile seizures and placed on medication, Bradly Hardee and Sandy Hardee of Supply were hoping things would soon return to normal.

    But the terrifying ordeal that followed is one Bradly, a Brunswick County Sheriff’s deputy, and Sandy, a registered nurse with Liberty Healthcare, never expected.

    The positive outcome that resulted is one they credit to the power of prayer and the community coming together.

  • Brunswick County code enforcement administrator Fred Morris is among more than 20 men who have signed on to compete in a womanless beauty pageant Saturday night in Little River, S.C., to benefit the Kayla Bennett Softball Scholarship Fund.

    Bennett was a rising junior at North Myrtle Beach High School when she was killed July 26, 2007, in a one-vehicle crash outside Loris, S.C., attributed to speeding and drunk driving by another teen.

  • Of the 21 couples participating in Brunswick Community College Foundation’s “Dancing With the Brunswick County Stars,” Bidgie Sue and Jim MacCallum may have the biggest challenge. Neither are professional dancers and neither have much dance experience.

    Sue, a retired high school English teacher, said she took ballet, tap and jazz classes when she was a young girl “like everybody’s mothers made them do,” and she and her husband took classes for a short time.

  • The first people to live on and near Ocean Isle Beach were Native Americans who arrived here about 10,000 B.C.

    There are many Native-American arrowheads and pottery pieces in farmers’ fields around Ocean Isle. The primary tribe in the Ocean Isle Beach area was the Cape Fear Indians, but there were also a few settlements of Waccamaw, Iroquois, Catawba, Lumbee and Choctaw. All of these tribes spoke the Siouan language.