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Today's Features

  • Are you one of those many gardeners wondering what to do with all those eggplants that just seem to keep showing up?

    Eggplant isn’t a particularly popular vegetable in the United States, but it’s a favorite in many areas of the South.

    Thomas Jefferson, who experimented with many varieties of plants in his Virginia garden, is credited with introducing eggplant to North America.

    Eggplant, a member of the nightshade family along with potatoes, tomatoes and peppers, is actually a fruit, and is classified botanically as a berry.

  • Labor Day looms, announcing summer’s demise with a huge sigh of regret. For a brief moment, we will celebrate the cessation of work and creation of play. Grills heat up, families gather and relaxing is the word of the day.

  • On the morning of her 28th birthday, Jaime Atwell and her maid of honor, Shannon Hughes, dipped out of the line outside Filene’s Basement in Washington D.C., which curled around two Washington D.C. city blocks, and staggered groggy-eyed to a nearby Starbucks.

    They had not eaten in hours. They had arrived at the Savoy Hotel on Wisconsin Avenue at 2:30 that morning, after a flat tire extended their road trip to eight hours, and awoke before dawn to get in line.

  • The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has purchased property adjacent to its Sunset Harbor Boating Access Area to improve parking in the area.

    The purchase—the first from the N.C. Waterfront Access and Marine Industry (WAMI) Fund—will also enable the commission to focus its resources on much needed renovations to the existing boat ramp on the Intracoastal Waterway. The WAMI funds will also provide funding to develop a small public fishing pier, said Gordon Myers, deputy director.

  • Maggie Stephens will start sixth grade in the fall, and she is already considering a career as a crime scene investigator.

    Like thousands of other students in Brunswick County, she is preparing for Aug. 25, the first day at her new school—Shallotte Middle.

    Maggie says math is her best subject, and after spending the summer in a school-age kids program at Tiny Tots Child Center near Shallotte, she’s ready for the challenges of middle school.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Last week’s article was about some of the issues people have brought up about the use of mulches in the landscape.

    I promised this week we would look at the benefits of mulching, but before we proceed, I want to let you read what our specialist from N.C. State provided to ease some of the concerns about the use of mulch and the presence of termites. Excerpt from Mike Waldvogel:

    The bottom line

  • Recently, we have received several calls on the Extension Master Gardener’s Hot Line concerning lack of blooms on various types of plants.

    Following are some possible reasons—sometimes, there are just no explanations:

    Shrubs and flowers that are supposed to bloom, but don’t often frustrate gardeners. Someone recently reported nothing in their yard would bloom and went on to name several species that normally flower well in this area.

  • South Carolina is the ‘Palmetto’ state in honor of the cabbage palm or sabal palmetto. This trunk-forming palm is native to coastal regions as far north as Bald Head Island, but it does pretty well all the way up to Onslow and Carteret counties in the ‘Tarheel’ state.

    The techniques necessary to successfully transplant a sabal palmetto are similar in some ways to what we try to do with typical trees and shrubs, but vastly different in others.

  • Brunswick County is where the first open armed resistance to the Stamp Act occurred on Nov. 28, 1765—eight years before the Boston Tea Party in 1773.

    In 1763, England sent 10,000 new Red Coats to the Colonies and began taxing the Colonies to pay for this expense. The British imposed the Stamp Act in 1765, and this infuriated colonists.