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Today's Features

  • Interested in where the candidates for North Carolina governor stand on the issues?

    Republican and Democratic candidates for governor will square off April 17 at the “2008 North Carolina Governor’s Stand Up and Vote Candidates Forum,” at the Schwartz Center on the campus of Cape Fear Community College, Wilmington.

    The Brunswick Beacon, a media partner for the candidate forum, is seeking questions from readers about what issues affect Brunswick County and its residents.

  • Daisy, an 8-month-old walker hound, peered through the bars of her cage, welcoming the touch and kindness of any human hand that reached out to her.

    “She was turned in by her owner because she doesn’t hunt,” said Richard Cooper, director of Brunswick County Animal Services, as he walked past noisy rows of barking, homeless dogs at the shelter on Green Swamp Road.

    He also told about a mother dog and her litter of 13 puppies that were recently brought to the shelter.

  • He was bred to fight bears, mountain lions and wolves, yet this 135-pound gentle giant is teaching children how to be safe around dogs of all shapes and sizes.

    Tagged as “The Traveling Dog,” Amadeus has been to 42 states, teaching children how to be safe around dogs.

    On Wednesday, April 23, the Ocean Isle Beach dog will visit children at Virginia Williamson Elementary School in Bolivia.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, Monday–Friday 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Artwork available for sale. Exhibit is renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 10

  • While students are out of school on spring break, don’t forget to appreciate local activities such as the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach and Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach.

    Described as a natural history site, the museum offers educational programs for school groups, a monthly lecture series and field trips on the island in the spring, summer and fall.

  • A joint creative connection between Hard Rock Park and legendary guitarist Jimmy Page, "Led Zeppelin—The Ride" was conceived to give Led Zeppelin fans the ultimate amusement park experience.

    "Led Zeppelin – The Ride," named by Page, will also feature the Zeppelin smash-hit “Whole Lotta Love” which was selected for the ride by Page himself. The band's hit will be pumped out on the coasters powerful 64 speakers, generating 1,200 watts of music as the coaster hurtles the screaming rider down its mile long track at speeds hitting 65 mph.

  • For the past two weeks, we have been examining the process of transforming your yard into a beautiful planned garden. This week, we focus on the final steps in the landscape process.

    Steps in the Process

    Develop a plot plan

    Conduct a site analysis

    Assess family needs

    Locate use areas

    Design, construct, and plant

    Assess Family Needs

  • Pine pollen may be coating sidewalks and cars with yellow dust, but it is not to blame for making people sneeze.

    People suffer from pollen allergies, but pine pollen doesn’t contribute to it. The chemical composition of pine pollen appears to make it less allergenic than other types.

    Because pine pollen is heavy, it tends to fall straight down, and does not scatter easily in the wind; therefore, it rarely reaches human noses.

  • Azaleas are blooming all over southeastern North Carolina right now.

    During these special two to three weeks, it’s easy to see why people are so enthusiastic about them. These plants have few rivals when it comes to making a colorful impact in the landscape.

    But, lots of people struggle to grow azaleas well. The secret is really no secret at all. You just have to do a good job of preparing the soil and choose the right location.

  • Birds called waders are always lurking around the salt marsh. Some are large and some small.

    They drop by to scrounge up some grub, especially when the tide is low, a time when mud flats are exposed and fish are concentrated into small pools of shallow water called pannes.

    This article is about two of the little guys. The big guys like the great blue heron and great egret can wait for a later article. They are so large and photogenic they get enough attention. I am pretty sure every Brunswick County resident who owns a camera has taken a photo of them by now.