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Today's Features

  • Holden Beach will be the place to walk your dog(s) this Saturday, March 29, as the second annual Bark at the Beach celebration and fundraiser unfolds under the Intracoastal Waterway bridge.

    Registration begins at 9 a.m., followed by the walk at 10 a.m. The fee is $20 to walk one dog with a walking buddy. T-shirts also will be available for participants.

  • Ongoing through March 28

    Carl Billingsley, “An Exhibition of Drawings, Model and Maquettes for Large Scale Sculptures,” The Art Gallery in the Cultural Arts Building at UNCW, Wilmington. For more information, contact Carlton Wilkinson, gallery director, Department of Art and Art History University of North Carolina Wilmington, at 962-7958 or via e-mail at wilkinsonc@uncw.edu.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

  • More than 100 high school students will have their work on display at Southport’s Franklin Square Gallery for the 14th annual High School Show running until May 10.

    The gallery’s exhibit chairperson Sue Ernest looks forward to this event.

    “It’s a real treat to display the exciting work done by the students,” she said. “The work is very original and often humorous. It keeps the viewer in touch with the ever-changing world. The art teachers are to be commended.”

  • How do you go about landscaping your yard? Former Extension Specialist Kim Powell wrote a wonderful guide going over the steps for landscaping which I have edited for our area in the Southeast. The process takes you through the necessary steps to determine just how to succeed in transforming your yard into a beautiful, well thought-out planned garden.

  • Leaves of three, let it be! The single most common cause of allergic reactions in the United States are those nasty plants poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. Each year, these plants cause millions of people to contract a skin rash known as “dermatitis.” Learning how to identify the growing habits of each plant in this area is the first step towards prevention of skin rashes.

    Poison Ivy

  • We’re working on our first full week of spring and that means lots of garden chores showing up on the honey-do list. If you’re still looking for something to do, go ahead and finish the pruning chores, fertilize your shrub beds if they need it and add a bit of fresh mulch, but leave the lawn fertilizer in the bag for now and try to resist the urge to plant summer annuals unless you’re prepared to lose them to a late frost.

  • Last week I had two appointments in Wilmington that were almost two hours apart. I try to double or triple up appointments to save fuel cost and reduce my carbon footprint.

    Also, not wanting to place my fate in the jaws of the green, demonic dragon that lies in wait, I always stay in Wilmington instead of returning to Brunswick County between appointments. I often spend an hour or two watching nature at the lake during my wait.

    If you don’t think Memorial Bridge is possessed, just try running a few minutes late for an appointment or meeting.

  • Next year will mark the 10th anniversary of Bald Head Island police officer Davina Buff Jones’ violent death from a single shot from her own gun while she was working an overnight shift near Old Baldy Lighthouse.

    Local authorities soon determined Jones’ bullet wound to the back of her head was self-inflicted.

    Her family, however, disagreed, arguing Jones was murdered, most likely at the hands of shady people involved in illegal drug dealings on the posh resort island that’s accessible only by boat.

  • A lack of affordable housing for working people has been the subject of much scrutiny in Brunswick County.

    Several summits were held seeking answers to the problem, and last December, county commissioners established the Revolving Home Construction Program that gives priority to local government employees.

  • Wild fish resources are shrinking around the world because of over-fishing and pollution, and tilapia (te-la-pe-a) aquaculture is being examined as a great way to help out.

    Unlike many other fish, tilapia can eat almost any kind of plant or microorganism found in water, and thrive in just about any conditions (as long as the water temperature is above 50-degrees. Since tilapia are easy to care for, some fishermen and farmers are looking to the water as a farming resource to be developed.