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Today's Features

  • Trinity plans Aug. 17 service

    Pastor Skip Williams’ sermon will be “Strength in Weakness,” based on scripture from Psalm 121 and Acts 9:19-22, 31, on Sunday, Aug. 17, at Trinity United Methodist Church, 209 East Nash St. in Southport.

    There will be a casual worship service at 8:30 a.m., a contemporary service at 9:40 a.m. in Murrow Hall with the Trinity Worship Band and a traditional worship service in the sanctuary at 11 a.m.

    Nursery care will be available during the 8:30 a.m., 9:40 a.m. and 11 a.m. services.

  • Rachel Gail Beck of Supply and Brandon Ray Hewett of Shallotte were married July 8 on Holden Beach with the Rev. Eddie Hill officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Rudy and Gail Beck of Supply.

    The groom is the son of Diane Todd of Shallotte.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her parents.

    Maid of honor was Heather Clemmons, and bridesmaids were Brittany King Galloway and Samantha Rooney.

    Kaylee Long served as flower girl and Brennan Dosher was ringbearer.

  • Education is the best way to fend off boating mishaps, says a spokesman for the Shallotte River Sail and Power Squadron.

    With several recent boating incidents that have occurred in the area and required the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard, an upcoming course may be coming in the nick of time.

    The Shallotte River Sail and Power Squadron has scheduled a boating course for four consecutive Monday nights, starting Sept. 8 at Brunswick Electric Membership Corp.

  • “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • My mother always said idle hands were the devil’s workshop among other things I tried to ignore as a kid. If you are looking for ways to avoid becoming a conduit for Beelzebub, I have several garden honey-do’s that will pay off handsomely.

    Crape myrtles that have finished their first round of blooms can usually be coaxed into an encore performance with just a little work.

  • Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall. Light pruning may be performed for most landscape plants except those you expect to have blooms from next spring such as azaleas. Storm damaged tissue may make it necessary to make heavier pruning cuts than normal to repair broken, leaning or dangerous limbs.

  • As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.

  • Fried green tomatoes are one of my favorite summer foods. If you haven’t tried them, you’re in for a treat.

    Native to Mexico and Central America, it’s not clear how tomatoes came to the United States. Thomas Jefferson grew them in the 1780s and credited one of his neighbors with the introduction, but Harriott Pinckney Horry recorded a recipe, “To Keep Tomatoes for Winter Use” in 1770.

  • The admonition found in Galatians 6:2 is one exhilarating and exhausting. It is, at once, a consolation and a challenge.

    We read, and hopefully heed, the words of St. Paul, “Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the laws of Christ.”

    The same command and commission can be found in the Torah, which demands the people of God seek the welfare of the whole human community. It is present in the five pillars of Islam, in the practices of Hinduism and in the eightfold path of Buddhism.