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Today's Features

  • The Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club had its annual Bash at the Beach on Saturday in the Home Depot parking lot.

    Club president Fred Taylor said the club formed in 1998 as an outlet for people to show and share their love of cars. An annual fundraiser has been every year since the club’s beginning.

    The first year, the club raised $6,800, which was donated to three local girls who had been injured in automobile accidents.

  • Three local artists take the spotlight in Franklin Square Gallery's new Members Show running from May 12 to June 19. Painters Susan Sokolowski and Ann Thompson and potter Eileen Gordon will be featured in this new exhibit by the members of the Associated Artists of Southport .

    Their diverse styles are the culmination of years of experience and recent classes and workshops, yet each still reflects on her continuing passion for art.

    Susan Sokolowski's detailed oil paintings often capture the immediacy of a scene because many are created from her own photographs.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash, is featuring works in pastel by Kevin Beck through May 9. Beck is a contemporary artist living in Blowing Rock.

    Known for the vibrancy and resonance of his palette, this well-known colorist sees and interprets the landscape in shades of teal, chartreuse and berry. Viewers are transfixed by the depth and translucence of his work both in pastel and oil.

  • The next step after developing a landscape plan and selecting the recommended plants adaptive to your area is to buy good quality plants free from insects and diseases. Be sure to inspect them thoroughly because if you don’t already have a problem in the landscape then you certainly don’t want to introduce one at this stage in the landscape process.

    People think plants can take care of themselves but giving them the best chance to survive and do well starts with the selection process and buying good quality plants.

  • Transplants from other parts of the world already know it is a requirement you include evergreen azaleas in your landscape. Shirk this responsibility and the azalea police will be on your case faster than a Garden-stater can utter “youse guys.” In an effort to help you avoid this unpleasantness, here are some tips on growing azaleas along with some varieties to consider.

  • The next two articles will attempt to answer questions that seem to be asked every spring. Hopefully, the two will prove helpful to our local residents.

    As soon as the weather turns warm, the lawn questions start. One of the most frequent concerns of gardeners this time of year is a “dead spot” in the lawn. Patches of dead grass in spring are common, can be caused by several factors and are very difficult to diagnosis correctly. Extensive grass loss through the winter is usually caused by something that happened several months ago.

  • Brunswick Little Theatre will present “The Silver Review,” an evening under the stars listening to a compilation of 25 years of songs from musicals performed by BLT, from 1983’s Brigadoon though its last musical, Godspell, in November 2007.

    Performances begin at 8 p.m. May 16-18 at the Holden Beach Pavilion, at the foot of the bridge, and May 23-25 at Franklin Square Park in Southport.

    Admission is free. If there is inclement weather after 5 p.m., the show will be canceled for that night.

  • The banana tree originated in India and eventually found its way through the tropical regions of the world, namely, Africa, Latin America, Australia and Southeast Asia.

    If you want to get technical however, the banana is not a tree, nor is the yummy yellow edible a fruit. The “tree” is actually a large herb and the banana is seedless and thus, botanically speaking, not a fruit.

  • We are accustomed to seeing pictures of city workers doing a massive cleanup in the wake of a celebratory parade or the return of conquering heroes, but there was no cleanup needed after Pope Benedict XVI left the United States. No litter was strewn along Main Street USA. In fact, his departure was amazingly quiet, at least in this neck of the woods.