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Today's Features

  • Beach Assembly of God to host program

    Beach Assembly of God, 6730 Ocean Hwy. W. in Ocean Isle Beach, will host a special service featuring Building HOPE Prison Ministries at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, June 1.

    Love gifts will be received for Building HOPE founders Gary and Donna Phelps.

    For more information, call 579-9701.

    All day Mah Jongg tournament planned

    The Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-EL will host an all-day summer Mah Jongg tournament on Thursday, June 12, at Temple Emanu-EL Rosen Center, 65th Ave. and Kings Highway in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Christy Montgomery and Michael Szwed, both of Myrtle Beach, S.C. The bride-elect is the daughter of June and Charles Simpson of North Myrtle Beach, S.C. The prospective groom is the son of Deborah Szwed of Longs, S.C. and Michael Szwed Sr. of New Jersey. A March 14, 2009, ceremony is planned at Chapel By The Sea.

  • Kristin Ann Lesley and Jason Britt Parker, both of Lakeland, Fla., were married at 8 p.m. March 23 in a double-ring ceremony in the Little White Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas.

  • I left Ocean Ridge for an adventure of a lifetime in Antarctica’s White Wilderness at 8:45 a.m. Feb. 27. My wife Carol opted not to join me (as did many other saner Ocean Ridge residents) as she had a healthy fear of the ship ride from Argentina through the Drake Passage (the roughest body of water in the world as the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the turbulent waters of the Antarctic converge).

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • Wherever I look in landscapes and turf, I see winter annual weeds going to seed. Now is a great time to assess the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of fall weed management programs. If henbit, speedwells, annual bluegrass and other winter annuals are plentiful in your beds, consider using a pre-emergence herbicide next August to prevent these pesky weeds from being as much of a nuisance next year.

  • Many questions have been asked about lichens. The following is a great article by Dan Mullins, Extension agent in Santa Rosa County, Fla.

    Things aren’t always what they seem in the landscape and such is the case when lichens infest shrubs. These gray-green scaly, crusty or hairy structures found on the branches of landscape plants are often unfairly blamed for causing sickly, dying shrubs.

  • A physically active lifestyle enhances the quality of life and benefits health at any age. Physical activity does not need to be strenuous to achieve health benefits. In fact, participation in moderate amounts of physical activity helps lower the risk of some diseases and provides other health benefits. Below you will find health benefits of being physically active:

    Increases in physical activity

    •Helps build and maintain healthy bones, muscles, and joints

    •Helps weight loss, maintenance of weight loss, and prevents weight gain

  • Southern magnolias have already begun their summer show and the early-blooming crape myrtles like Natchez won’t be far behind. Included are a few of the things I learned after observing these plants since last year.

    Little Gem continues to be the most popular southern magnolia in the trade. There are some perfectly good reasons for that. It fits better into most gardens since it only reaches about 30 feet or so. Little Gem also blooms heavily at an early age. That’s something many of the southern magnolias don’t do.

  • Basil, like many foods throughout the ages, has had a multitude of identities.

    Basil is derived from the Greek word basiliskos, which literally translates as “Little King.”

    It is alleged basil was a constituent in various regal potions and medicines; however, if you were to hop in your time machine and visit various eras and places around the globe, you would encounter many different associations with basil.

    Legend of basil

    Legend has it basil grew around Christ’s tomb, as well as on the spot where the Holy Cross was found.