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Today's Features

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Laura Antonio Libero of Salemburg and William Richard Hickman of Ocean Isle Beach. The bride-elect is the daughter of Angelo and Roberta Libero of Salemburg. The prospective groom is the son of Yogi and Gail Hickman of Ocean Isle Beach. A June 28 wedding is planned at New Beginnings Community Church.

  • SHALLOTTE—They came. They walked. They helped raise a record amount of money for cancer.

    When Brunswick County’s two-day, overnight 13th Annual Relay for Life concluded last Saturday afternoon at West Brunswick High School, a record amount of money had been raised for the American Cancer Society—$364,000.

    Relay chairman Renee Adams said organizers are still counting as money continues to roll in.

  • Howie Franklin will be unable to present his lecture, “Stories from Air Force One,” at the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach on May 13. Franklin will reschedule his talk at a later time.

    Just in time, Fred David will present “History of Ocean Isle Beach: From 10,000 B.C. to Today.”

    He will talk about his new CD, “The History of Ocean Isle Beach Driving Tour” and his upcoming book about Ocean Isle’s history. Learn true stories about men and women who lived at Ocean Isle Beach thousands of years ago.

  • A coastal sunrise breaks over the horizon, bathing in vivid hues a Carolina marsh looking very much like one in Brunswick County.

    Other coastal scenes are captured in the acrylic paintings of Brunswick County native Norman “Marshall” Gore, a former prisoner whose work was recently chosen for display and sale at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash.

    Since his release from a halfway house in March after more than 25 years in prison, Gore, 46, is striving to launch a new career as an artist, in a new direction from his criminal past.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Outsider art will be celebrated this weekend as the Eighth Annual Summer Folk Art Festival kicks off at House of Blues in North Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    Regional and national artists will display their work around the venue for purchase.

    The festival will open at 9 a.m. and continue until 10 p.m. May 10 and 11. Admission is free.

  • Sunset River Marketplace’s “Creative Exchange” series continues with “The Art of Serving Tea” by Kathy Cody and Anna Arlington, owners of the Calabash Garden Tea Room and Gift Shop. It will be from 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 14, at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash.

  • A fellow stopped by the office last week and asked a very pertinent question: “Isn’t grass supposed to be green?” He had a centipede lawn with lots of yellow spots and streaks that turned even more yellow when he added nitrogen.

    If this sounds like your lawn, you’re probably dealing with high pH soils and iron chlorosis. For most folks, talking about the vagaries of plant nutrition is about as exciting as watching the one stoplight change in the little town I grew up in, so I won’t bore you with all of the gory details.

  • Based on the number of calls coming into the office, carpenter bees appear to be gearing up for another season of aggravating homeowners. Carpenter bees resemble bumblebees, but they have abdomens that are entirely black and shiny. Bumblebees have yellow hairs on their abdomens.

    In the spring, carpenter bees drill holes about 3/8-inch in diameter into wood, most notably into decks, eaves and siding. Last year, many of the complaints we received indicated the bees seem to have a real liking for cedar and cypress siding.

  • Spring has started on a dry note along our coastline. Drought conditions are unpredictable and can be difficult to deal with in the landscape. Although droughts are usually thought of as long periods of time, such as months or years, our sandy soils can experience drought conditions after only a few days without rain. Even if we don’t have an outright drought this summer, preparing your lawn for dry weather is smart.