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Today's Features

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH — A roomful of residents turned out to hear proposed plans to build another traffic-circle roundabout, this time at N.C. 179 and N.C. 904/Ocean Isle Beach Road.

    Several had concerns at the May 21 public meeting at Ocean Isle Beach Town Hall, along with complaints about the newly opened roundabout at Old Georgetown Road and N.C. 904/Four Mile Road.

  •  If you go

    What: Bailout

    When: 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 29

    Where: Museum of Coastal Carolina, 21 E. Second St., Ocean Isle Beach

    Admission: free; cash donations accepted for food pantry; no chairs setup before 5:15 p.m.

    They’re a local band renowned for their talents on the local circuit.

    Bailout is a band regularly playing the hits and classics at Sharky’s Waterfront Restaurant in Ocean Isle Beach and other local venues.

  • This Saturday in the park will be another pickin’ and singin’ celebration.

    The 12th annual Mostly Bluegrass Spring Festival, scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Riverside Park in Shallotte, will feature variegated vocal and acoustic skills of four North Carolina bluegrass bands, along with an all-day music jam open to anyone who wants to sing or jam on a bluegrass instrument.

    “We bring a variety of groups,” Jim Caulder, president of the Shallotte-based Mostly Bluegrass Society, said.

  •  By Sam Marshall

    Horticulture Agent

     

    Looking for native plants? Worried about Bambi sneaking into your garden and destroying your hostas? A problem for many gardeners, deer seem to feed on just about everything, aside from maybe those inflatable palm trees you see at the pool. Battle-weary gardeners can take heed (and maybe sit down), because believe it or not, there are more than a few native plants that will resist deer and also enhance the beauty of your landscape.

     

    Why native plants?

  •  Ask most gardeners about sweet-smelling flowering shrubs for the garden, and gardenia will be at the top of the list. This prom corsage favorite is a little too sickeningly sweet for my taste, but it does a great job of perfuming the garden.

    Once you get past gardenia, the consensus on making your garden life sweet breaks down, but luckily, there are lots of options for sweet-smelling shrubs in southeastern North Carolina.

  •  For the past six weeks, I’ve been sharing ideas on five-ingredient recipes. We’ve done breakfasts, soups, chili, oven meals and even cereal dinners. You may be wondering about desserts, too.

  •  One of my daughters teaches social studies in a Connecticut middle school. She’s been happily committed to this vocation for nearly 30 years. I am always interested in her experiences, observations, perceptions, and perspectives on today’s methodology.

     

  •  By John Nelson

     

    How could anyone not love this lovely little plant?

  •  Onions lend themselves to a variety of cooking methods

    Highly versatile, onions are an indispensable commodity throughout the world, lending themselves to a variety of preparations and cooking methods.

    So why do they make you cry?

    When you pierce an onion, you cut its cellular network, releasing a series of sulfur-based compounds that instantly combine and re-combine, causing sulfonic acid to be given off and triggering our tear response when we breathe it in. Now, aren’t you sorry you asked?

  •  Apple earns highest Girl Scout honor for strong bones curriculum

     

    North Carolina Coastal Pines congratulates Trisha Angelique Apple of Ash for earning the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouting.