Today's Features

  •  Butt-dragging. Carpet-surfing. Booty-scooting. These colorful terms have all been applied to one of the more common unusual actions of our canine companions: dragging and rubbing their rear end along the floor. Why do dogs scoot and rub their butts on the carpet? Let’s examine some of the many potential causes of “hiney-hauling.”


    Anal Sacs

  •  By Linda Arnold


    Chocolate. Potato chips. Ice cream.

    You know the triggers — and the power they have over you. Rest assured you’re not alone.

    Food cravings can have little to do with hunger, though, and lots to do with mental and physiological components. Let’s take a look at the main causes of these cravings and some tips for overcoming them. 


    Causes of food cravings


    Leptin resistance

  •  By John Nelson

    Pick a tree — any tree — and try to describe it using only eight words — in Latin. That’s what botanist Thomas Walter did in 1788, after studying and then naming this tree. His eight words (see below) indicate that the tree has paired needles, a short, oblong or egg-shaped cone and a smooth trunk.

  •  Having sight, being sighted, has taken on new meaning for me.

    Two of my friends have been pivotal in my deepening awareness of vision’s wonder. One is a woman who has become totally blind after years of lessening sight. The other is a man who awakened one morning to the reality that he had no sight in one eye.

    Both individuals, in their differing circumstances, were challenged to accept a loss and to find in it a gift. No doubt, this was not an easy task. Nor is it one that is completed in one fell swoop.

  • Shopping local is a very popular trend these days, especially shopping at farmer’s markets or local roadside shops for fresh fruits and vegetables.

    Not only does it allow us to get the freshest possible produce, it helps the local economy. Buying directly from farmers gives them a better return for their produce and can help a family farm compete in the food marketplace. Buying local food also keeps dollars circulating in the community and increases local food security.

  •  The North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce again sponsored the North Carolina Rice Festival at the Brunswick Riverwalk at Belville Sept. 18 and 19.

    In addition to the rice cooking contest, of which I was privileged to be one of the judges, festivalgoers enjoyed live music both days, many displays and exhibitors, arts and craft vendors, food vendors, a children’s entertainment zone, a youth art contest and a beer garden just for the adults.

  • New entertainment and a record number of vendors highlight this year’s 10th-anniversary Sunset at Sunset festival in Sunset Beach.

    Scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, in the Village at Sunset Beach next to Ingram Planetarium, this year’s event features a record number of vendors — 121 at last count — as well as new vendors.

    Event organizer Karen Joseph said some vendors are coming from as far as Maryland and Virginia.

  • “Kaleidescopika,” a unique collaboration of music and muse, kicks off the BCCOWA Performing Arts Series at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1.

    The performance in Odell Williamson Auditorium on the campus of Brunswick Community College in Bolivia is described as the “art of unfolding,” showcasing a touring alliance of cordis, a maverick contemporary chamber music group from Boston, Mass., and the Muse Cirque Company of Brooklyn, N.Y.

  • Wooden boats of all makes and sizes will be on display at the Old Yacht Basin in Southport during the seventh annual Southport Wooden Boat Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Admission is free.

    Visitors can meet and talk with the wooden boat makers and owners and vote for their favorite entrant for the People’s Choice Award.

    A team of judges will award six other prizes.

  • CALABASH — Town commissioners have agreed to have a special meeting at 6 p.m. Sept. 29 for a developer of Devaun Park to present modified plans for the upscale community off Beach Drive.

    Vaughn Stanaland has presented plans to modify phase 6B in the community calling for lower-density development that would reduce the number units from 103 single- and multi-family units to 40 all single-family units.

    The town’s planning and zoning board recommended approval of the request following a presentation at its Sept. 6 meeting.