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Today's Features

  • As we all start looking for plants as spring approaches, the following may be of some help:

    Many gardeners are addicted to visiting garden centers and nurseries and greenhouses in search of plants, trees, shrubs, annuals and houseplants. They shop and compare prices but are never quite sure what a plant is worth. The problem is some sort of valuation is placed on the plant. We try to figure out the worth or value of the plant in comparison to another source of supply. To some extent, that is a reasonable approach.

  • Many of you have watched this bird on telephone lines all your life and may know it by its former name, the sparrow hawk. This certainly matches my experience growing up in Eastern North Carolina.

    My apologies to the American Ornithologists Union, I have to confess I sometimes use a former name for a species because it has a more down-home, nostalgia-invoking feel to it.

  • This year’s election is a “dangerous cycle” that Republicans need to be aware of and act accordingly, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Dole said during a visit to Brunswick County Republican Headquarters Saturday afternoon.

    “There are 23 Republicans up for re-election in the United States Senate,” Dole said. “There are only 12 Democrats. If they’re able to get a filibuster-proof Senate, all hell is going to break loose. Excuse me for saying that, but it will be a very, very difficult situation.

  • What's the national dish of Ireland? Corned beef and cabbage, you say? Since March has undoubtedly become “Irish Awareness Month,” I thought it would be fun to explore the truth behind yet another Irish myth.

  • 'Sing into Spring' concert set

    The “Sing into Spring” concert, featuring several youth groups from Shallotte Presbyterian, Camp United Methodist and Village Point United Methodist, will take place at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 6, at Calabash Presbyterian Church.

    Mike Sullivan once again will assume the role of master of ceremonies.

  • I was en route to Southport. The day was balmy, in contrast to some wintry weather we had been experiencing, and I was both excited and nervous about a talk I was scheduled to present.

  • Amanda Kaye Gore and Clifton Wayne Black of Shallotte are the parents of a daughter, Kaycey Noelle Black, born at 1:32 p.m. Dec. 4, 2007 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 6 pounds, 5 ounces and measured 18 inches long.

    She joins a half-brother, Camren Patrick Daley, 5.

    Maternal grandparents are Cleve and Sylvia Gore of Shallotte and Regina Gore of Blairsville, Va.

    Paternal grandparents are Wendy Black and Farion Black, both of Shallotte.

    Great-grandparents are Trudy Freeman of Calabash and Robert Lee Cheers and James Edwards, both of Shallotte.

  • Rebecca Rae Evans of Shallotte and Roy Edwin Stephens of Ash were united in marriage Feb. 16 by the Rev. Clayton Rivenbark.

    The bride is the daughter of Becky Owens of Shallotte.

    The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Edwin Stephens of Ash.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her mother.

    She wore a long, ivory crepe back satin gown embellished with embroidered organza lace and sprinkled with pearls and sequins. A candy apple red sash draped the waist and fell the full length of the train.

    Her gown was designed and made by her grandmother.

  • When Cpl. Todd Coring drives by in his night black SUV—silver rims gleaming, red letters emblazoned across the side—it’s hard to miss him.

    But that’s the way he wants it.

    Coring is Brunswick County’s Drug Abuse Resistance Education officer for the county’s nine elementary schools, and he says his SUV is “catching a lot of eyes.”

  • Whether we are suffering through a prolonged drought as we are now or just trying to have your garden make it through the sweltering summers of the Carolinas, wise use of water is important.

    Practicing water conservation not only helps protect the environment but also saves money and provides for optimum growing conditions.