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Today's Features

  • Homeowners with excess moisture in their crawl spaces often wage war with wood-destroying organisms, such as wood-decaying fungi, termites and wood-boring beetles. But winning the war means first solving the moisture problem, not battling the bugs and fungi.

  • On the morning of the Feb. 18 total lunar eclipse, I was suddenly driven to photograph the event. Without planning and with little study, I grabbed my camera and birding scope, jumped in to my SUV, and headed to Fort Fisher’s rock seawall. I was the first to arrive around 6:30 p.m. and the last to leave around 11:30 p.m.

  • SHALLOTTE—More than 500 people came out Saturday to The Brunswick Beacon’s second annual health expo at West Brunswick High School.

    Event coordinator Christy Williamson, who called the health expo “a huge success,” said this year’s attendance was up from last year because of word of mouth from last year’s inaugural event.

    Fifty-five vendors were on hand, including doctors, pharmacists, chiropractors, medical supply vendors and various nonprofit agencies.

  • Greetings from Anchorage!

    I have been running wide open going from meeting to meeting, picking up gear, shooting shots and being involved in this incredible adventure known as The Iditarod.

    It’s cold! On the morning of March 1, it is around 15 degrees with a 14 mph wind (which is like a sharp knife shooting in you) bringing the wind chill to around zero.

    It’s 7 a.m. (11 a.m. back home) and still very dark. It looks like the middle of the night, but down below you can still see workers and volunteers setting the stage for what will be an incredible event.

  • The Brunswick County Democratic Party will have its annual precinct organizational meetings during the weeks of March 10 and March 17.

    All meetings are free and open to any registered Democrat residing in the precinct.

    The meetings are scheduled at the following times and locations:

    7 p.m. on March 10: The Town Creek precinct will meet at the Town Creek Community Building. The Boiling Springs Lakes precinct will meet at the BSL Community Center.

  • Oranges are highly valued for their vitamin C content and are a primary source of vitamin C for most Americans. This wonderful fruit has more to offer nutritionally than just this one nutrient, containing sufficient amounts of folacin, calcium, potassium, thiamin, niacin and magnesium.

    Most of the consumption of oranges is in the form of juice. Eating the whole fruit provides 130 percent of the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin C, less than the juice, but more fiber, which is not present in the juice.

    Make Oranges Part of Your Daily Plan

  • “This is a journey, and each one travels differently.” Thus spoke the ophthalmologist to his impatient patient, a man chomping at the bit to return to “normalcy.”

    The doctor quietly but firmly repeated his message, adding that everyone heals differently. Each lens implant adheres uniquely, conforming to the individual shape of the eye. His lesson was clear. The voyage toward improved vision may be walked together, but each voyager experiences it personally and, in a sense, alone.

  • Ashleigh Corrin Williams and Frederick Devon Williams of Longwood were united in marriage Feb. 25 at the Brunswick County Courthouse.

    Martha Currie officiated.

    The bride is the daughter of Sharon W. Best (Jessie) of Longwood and Richard L. Stallings of Shallotte.

    The groom is the son of Geneva F. Williams (Ronald) and Johnnie M. Brown of Supply.

  • Beth McCray and Eric Kerr are the parents of a son, Dominic Anthony Kerr, born at 8:37 p.m. Feb. 18 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 5 ounces and measured 21 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are Sheila McCray of Supply and Tony McCray of Lumberton.

    Paternal grandmother is Cathy Kerr of Supply.

    Paternal great-grandparents are Jesse and Joyce Hardee of Laurinburg and Tyson Barber of Wagram. Maternal great-grandparents are W.K. and Shirley Lewis of Supply.

  • “New” is a great marketing campaign. Stop by the supermarket and you’ll find all kinds of “new and improved” stuff on the shelves. Gardeners are enamored with “new” just like everyone else. Take a look at your favorite garden catalog and you’ll see lots of space devoted to the new and unusual.

    During a recent visit with an old nursery friend of mine, I saw two new plants that have lots of potential for our landscapes: Taiwan cherry and Steeplechase arborvitae.