Today's Features

  • Editor’s note: Seventh in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”


  • While the history of Valentine’s Day is muddled with the Romans, the Pagans and the Christians claiming credit, it’s a fair bet you had better show up every year with something for your sweetheart. And, getting the last arrangement from the cooler at the supermarket is not a winning strategy. 

    Roses are traditional but short-lived and, during this time, overpriced. If your significant other likes to play in the dirt, next year consider purchasing a rose that can be planted in the garden.

  • The first news story I’d like to share with you this week comes to us from the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. UC Davis is home to sunshine, surfing, and cutting-edge coprophagy (defined as eating feces) research. The researchers wanted to discover how many dogs had coprophagy, what led to these coprophagous behaviors and whether any of the common treatments for coprophagy actually work.

  • Little girls and their male role models are royally highlighted at the upcoming Little Princess Ball scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, at three sites this year.

    The fun unfolds simultaneously at the Brunswick Center at 101 Stone Chimney Place in Supply, the Leland Cultural Arts Center at 1212 Magnolia Village Way and at the Brunswick Center at 1513 N. Howe St. in Southport.

  • Residents of the Lower Cape Fear region were not happy about the 1765 Stamp Act imposed by the British Crown — a tax on all newspapers, gambling papers, books pamphlets and more.

    The town of Brunswick returns to 1766 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, when historic interpreters demonstrate trades and show how the dreaded Stamp Act affected their lives during the 252nd Anniversary of the Stamp Act Resistance program. 

    See how the seeds of discontent in Brunswick Town led to the first acts of resistance against the Crown in the American colonies.

  • Brunswick Family Assistance celebrates its Inaugural Valentine’s Gala from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, at the Leland Cultural Arts Center at 1212 Magnolia Village Way in Leland.

    The attire for this BFA fundraiser is eveningwear.

    Coastal Catering will provide dinner. Chance Union Band will perform live music and entertainment. There will be a cash bar for beer and wine, plus a 50/50 raffle.

    Tickets are $75 per person.

  • A Valentine Masquerade Fundraiser to benefit military, ex-offenders and veterans heartens the holiday from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 10, in the Brunswick Community College gymnasium, 50 College Road in Bolivia.

    The event is to benefit Return with Honor, a new Brunswick County nonprofit dedicated to creating employment opportunities and training for people who have served in the military and ex-offenders.

  • Paws-Ability’s annual Mardi Gras 4 Paws fun rolls out 6 to 9 p.m. next Fat Tuesday, Feb. 13, at Jinks Creek Waterfront Grille at 14 Causeway Drive in Ocean Isle Beach.

    Tickets are $30 per person, which includes festivities with live jazz music by the Sea & Sand Band and incredible New Orleans-themed menu with Cajun appetizers, multiple food stations, cash bar and a King Cake with hidden prizes donated by Seaside Bakery & Wine Shop.

  • Fans of Journey have an opportunity to relive the legendary band and its hits when the lights go up on DSB Journey Tribute at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 9, in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College in Bolivia.

    “DSB has been highly revered by fans as the ‘next best thing’ to Journey,” reads a promo on the Odell Williamson website where the tribute can be sampled and tickets can be purchased at bccowa.com.

    “They have captured the lush and signature sound of renowned vocalist Steve Perry and Journey in their prime.”

  • By John Nelson

    We have no bananas today, but we have something very, very similar, something that brings us a very decidedly Latin American addition to our menus. This wonderful stuff, hot and tasty, comes from a fruit that looks like a banana. In fact, they represent a different variety of the same hybrid plant which is the banana of commerce.