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Today's Features

  • During the month of October, the N.C. Cooperative Extension service will be offering a series of classes on heart healthy cooking. Each week will feature a topic related to heart disease and a related food demonstration. Obviously, all of the foods and recipes will be heart healthy. The classes will be held on Thursdays from 1:30to 3:30 p.m. at the Brunswick County Extension Training Center, 25 Referendum Drive at the Government Center in Bolivia.

  • By Katie McKee

    Brunswick County 4-H Agent

     

  • Many of us have cooked meat in a hot pan lightly covered in olive oil and then deglazed the pan with either a rich beef or chicken stock or our favorite white or red wine. This classic French sauté method is credited to Pierre Franey, whose series of “60-Minute Gourmet” cookbooks taught a generation of Americans about the versatility and speed of this classic technique.

  • Usually, I am not eager to enter political conversations. I drag my feet because I know my information is sketchy at best and ill-informed at worst. Without knowledge of the whole story gained and gleaned from worthy sources, I fear expounding on facts that are not demonstrably accurate. The old adage encouraging one to be silent lest one’s ignorance becomes apparent impels my muteness.

  • Blending funk, soul, blues and Carolina beach music, The Holiday Band provides a festive audio backdrop year-round.

    The band’s been playing since 1991 when it launched in Burlington, playing 175-plus dates annually.

    The award-winning band consists of lead vocalist Doug Neese, saxophonist Bob Martin, and vocalist-guitarist-keyboardist-songwriter Mike Taylor, who penned the band’s 2003 No. 1 R&B hit, “I’m Man Enough,” which won the Song of the Year award at that year’s Carolina Beach Music Awards Show.

  •  Grits are a staple of the Southern breakfast. For those unfamiliar with them, grits are nothing more than coarsely ground, dried corn. If you grind it a little finer, you have the Italian staple, polenta…grind it finer yet, and you have corn meal.

    I’ve heard that some places like to combine grits with hominy, which is soaked in lye. Why would you want to soak food in lye, and then actually eat it?

  • Have you ever laughingly placed your hands in a defensive position in front of your face and declared, “That’s more information than I need to know!” Usually it happens when someone is offering personal, intimate, even graphic tidbits about health or hygiene. Embarrassment invades the space between speaker and listener and we’d rather not be party to the proffered data.

  • It seems that everyone wants to find that perfect food, the one that’s going to solve all their health problems. I really don’t think there is such a food, but there are two groups of goods that can help improve your health and reduce your risk of chronic disease. What are these foods?

    Yes, you guessed it: fruits and vegetables.

  • Grits are a staple of the Southern breakfast. For those unfamiliar with them, grits are nothing more than coarsely ground, dried corn. If you grind it a little finer, you have the Italian staple, polenta … grind it finer yet, and you have corn meal.

    I’ve heard that some places like to combine grits with hominy, which is soaked in lye. Why would you want to soak food in lye, and then actually eat it?

  • Audrey Nicole Smith of Supply is the proud parent of a son, Bladen Kyler Smith, born at 4:11 p.m. Aug. 18 at Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center weighing 5 pounds, 14 ounces and measuring 18½ inches long.
    Paternal grandparents are Lindberg and Carrie Lane Smith of Supply.
    Great-grandparents are the late Junior and Mina Smith of Shallotte and the late Bill and Rulane Lane of Supply.