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Today's Features

  •  Typically, my mornings begin with a cup of coffee and my devotional, “Give Us This Day,” followed by a trek to the computer to receive my electronic spiritual boost from the Center for Action and Contemplation, Father Richard Rohr’s site. His daily words seem always to be just what I need to read, hear, and heed. They were particularly spot on a week or so ago.

  •  By John Nelson

    A botanist living here in the sunny South sometimes feels the urge to tease his northern counterparts once it starts getting to be cold. Way up north, it always snows a lot in the winter, and all the plants are frozen. All the botanists will be tramping inside out of the snow, taking off their boots and furry parkas, settling into their nice warm herbarium, and poring over the specimens they collected all through the growing season, which is something like May through August, and they’ll be dreaming of a flowery landscape.

  •  When planning for your weekly meals, sometimes it’s more convenient to make some things ahead of time. This may be especially true for ground beef, especially if you plan on making some chili, casseroles, tacos or even spaghetti sauce during the week.

    Maybe it’s just me, but when browning ground beef, do you typically end up with large chunks that are hard to break down? Don’t you just hate that? Or maybe you just like it all chunky.

  •  Army Pvt. Aaron D. Harris has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.

    During the nine weeks of training, Harris studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises.

  •  Army Spc. David K. Lewis, son of David R. Lewis of Leland, has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.

  • SUPPLY — They recall circuit preachers and initial church gatherings inside an old house.

    In fact, when Sabbath Home Baptist Church got its start a century ago, it wasn’t even Baptist.

    The fledgling church began as an offshoot of Sharon Methodist Church. Now, a century later, members of the historic Baptist church are celebrating its 100th anniversary at a special 10 a.m. homecoming service this coming Sunday, Nov. 9, and the public is invited.

  • At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month, United States veterans are traditionally honored.

    Veterans Day ceremonies are scheduled once again this year in and around Brunswick County.

     

    Calabash

    Veterans Day ceremonies will take place at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, at Calabash VFW Post 7288 at 900 Carter Drive.

    Another Veterans Day ceremony is scheduled at the same time and day at American Legion Post 503 at 10277 Beach Drive in Calabash.

  • The Brunswick Beacon’s fourth annual Holiday Happenings Christmas Show will unfold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, at Shallotte Middle School.

    Admission and parking at the school are free.

    Highlights this year include more than 70 unique vendor and artist/artisan booths.

    “The best Santa in the world” will also be back, arriving at 10:30 a.m. aboard a Shallotte fire engine. He will also be available for visits and free photographs with children.

  • Renowned musician Randy Linder and his band are bringing their Premier Tribute to Creedence Clearwater Revival to Brunswick Community College on Thursday night, Nov. 6.

    The 7:30 p.m. performance in Odell Williamson Auditorium will showcase all the hit songs of the popular 1960s-70s band also known as CCR.

  • CALABASH — At dusk on a crisp fall evening, Sam Bellamy ushered another group of youth and adults into the back of a rickety, tractor-pulled hay wagon.

    Autumn means many things at Bellamy’s historic, family-owned Indigo Farms, including old-fashioned hayrides that are a popular attraction at the farm straddling the Carolinas line.