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Today's Features

  • Have you ever seen a starfish served its lunch?

    You can at the Museum of Coastal Carolina.

    At 11 a.m. every Friday, museum visitors can get up close and personal with all the critters in the touch tank at the museum at 21 E. Second St. in Ocean Isle Beach.

    Children and adults of all ages are invited to come and watch the museum docents feed the array of live, local sea animals that live at the museum.

  •  IF YOU GO

    What: “The Fantasticks”

    When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 20; doors open at 7 p.m.

    Where: Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College

    Tickets: $29 adults; $27 students and seniors 65+; $10 ages 12 and younger; plus handling fees

    Go to: www.bccowa.com or call the OWA box office at (910) 755-7416

  • The town of Carolina Shores will have its sixth annual Arbor Day celebration starting at 9:30 a.m. Friday, March 21, at town hall on Persimmon Road.

    Highlights include presentation of a Tree City USA Award by a Brunswick County forest representative.

    Second-graders in Jennifer Parton’s class at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School will again assist with a tree-planting ceremony, facilitated by members of the town’s tree advisory committee.

    The Calabash Fire Department will also be on hand with fire truck tours for the class.

  • Dance fitness pro Sara McGrail will lead a Zumbathon fundraising party Friday afternoon, March 21, to benefit the Veterans Welcome Home and Resource Center in Little River, S.C.

    The event kicks off at Little River United Methodist Church, 1629 U.S. 17 at Mineola Avenue in Little River, with registration from 12:30 to 1 p.m., followed by a Zumbathon master class from 1 to 3 p.m. and a silent auction and raffles from 3 to 4 p.m.

    The cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Donations are greatly appreciated.

  • Smoking is bad for people and secondhand smoke is bad for pets. No news there. The real news is that the now ubiquitous e-cigarette can also pose a deadly danger to dogs. If you thought secondhand smoke was dangerous, wait until you hear about the evils of e-cigs.

  • I try to keep up on both the research and fads in foods and nutrition. The latest I’ve come across is the chia seed. They are all over the health food websites and TV doctors are pushing them as the food of the year. I’ve even found them in chips and crackers in my favorite big-box stores. There seems to be a lot of enthusiasm from the proponents.

  • For a long time, the only parts of a chicken that held my interest were the legs, wings and breasts — I was never much of a thigh guy. Lately, though, I decided to embrace them and have begun looking around for different ways to cook them.

    Surprisingly, they have the best flavor and tend to stay juicy even if you overcook them. Full of flavorful dark meat, they are much cheaper than those top-dollar skinless chicken breasts.

  • Annually, the first Friday of March draws attention to the World Day of Prayer, a time to gather as God’s people in prayerful contemplation and petition regarding global cares and concerns. Each year, women of a designated nation prepare the service, which is then disseminated universally and, optimally, used for worship across the globe simultaneously — no matter the time zone. This year, the theme is Streams in the Desert. Its dual focus is on Egypt and the Scriptural story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well.

  • By John Nelson

    Plant Columnist

    Have you ever been inside an herbarium? The word “herbarium” is often confused with the word “arboretum.” Now, an herbarium, such as the one where I work, is a collection of dried, pressed plants, used variously as a scientific resource for botanists who study plant taxonomy. An arboretum, on the other hand, is basically a garden of living trees.

  • The International Space Station (ISS) is 250 miles above Earth and orbits Earth every 90 minutes.

    It has been visited by astronauts, scientists, and cosmonauts from 15 different countries and has been continuously occupied for more than 13 years.

    What is it like to live aboard the ISS?