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Today's Features

  • They’re a 50-voice community choir converging from all over Brunswick County and three adjacent counties.

    At 7 p.m. this coming Sunday, July 30, the ensemble called UNITED unites at Mount Olive Baptist Church at 2919 Galloway Road in Bolivia to present a free public concert.

    Choir director Michael Galloway, a Brunswick County native and son of longtime Mount Olive Baptist Church Pastor Anthony Clemmons, deems UNITED a ministry and opportunity to bring a variety of people and their unique talents together.

  • Pre-sales have almost sold out the first batch of copies of Brunswick Coastal Cookbook, which officially goes on sale Thursday, July 27.

    The cookbook consists of coastal recipes, history and information about Brunswick Catch, a collaborative effort of the Brunswick County Economic Development Commission, Brunswick County Commissioners, North Carolina Sea Grant and Carteret Catch to promote and educate people about locally harvested seafood.

    The front cover art on the book was done by Terrah Hewett. The back cover features art by local artist Bryan Varnam.

  • Tickets are still available for Historic Amuzu Theatre’s eighth 1950s and‘60s music extravaganza, “It’s Gotta Be Rock and Roll Music,” Aug. 3-6 and 17-20 at the theater at 111 N. Howe St. in Southport.

    Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays.

    This year’s revue pays tribute to rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry, who died in March at 90.

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  • By John Nelson

    “I'm as corny as Kansas in August ...”

                                    Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, lyrics by O. Hammerstein

     

    Well, it’s not August yet, and this plant is not exactly corn. But it’s close.

  • Once again, it’s time for a refresher course for cooking one of my favorite cuts of meat. It has been by far the most requested recipe from readers of this column, but many are still unsure of the cooking temperature and time.

    An eye of round roast is roasted at 475 degrees and takes a very tough piece of meat and makes it really tender and delicious. A recipe with few ingredients, it’s probably the easiest roast you'll ever cook.

  • I had read William Paul Young’s book, “The Shack,” when it was first published, finding it an easy read. In honesty, I was not terrifically impressed with its theological underpinnings and found the story line rather fantastical. However, loads of people were touting its praise. Weeks on the New York Times best seller list and more than 20 million sales would add doubt to the validity of my first impression. Then came the movie, which I have yet to view, bearing additional erosion of my original conviction.

  • By Linda Arnold

     

    “Scary equals aliveness.”

    I saw this quote on a poster awhile back — with a picture of a skydiver. Although I didn’t feel the need to go out and try skydiving, I’ll admit the quote had an effect on me.

  • Perhaps my favorite pet health trend is the push toward clean pet foods. For decades, it’s been challenging for both veterinarians and pet parents to decipher pet food labels and determine what is (or isn’t) in the bag or can. I’m excited to see pet food companies address these concerns by pledging to support “clean labels” and providing increased transparency on ingredients. This subtle shift matters because clean pet food and easy-to-read labels are important for your dog’s health and energy, and your peace of mind.     

  • For the past couple of weeks in this column I’ve been talking about freezing foods and how to keep it from developing freezer burn and off-flavors. But one food I haven’t specifically talked about is bread. I bet everyone has at one time or another thrown a loaf of bread directly into the freezer in the store wrapper and then wondered what happened when you took it out a few weeks or months later. It was crumbly, dry, tasted a lot like the “freezer” and was basically inedible.