Today's Features

  • When Lent arrives in the throes of springtime, I have a hard time with its accompanying theme of passionate suffering. New life sprouts around me, especially in the southern climes where warmth leaves late and returns early to soothe arthritic bones. The paradox of pain in the midst of rising spirits is a hard pill to swallow. I want to concentrate on the green leaves peeping out from their cold dirt hibernation, forget winter and enjoy springtime’s slide into summer. Lent has no place in those plans. Yet, here it is.

  • I love puppies, kittens and most every critter around (except for that black widow spider that nearly killed my late father when he was a kid). As a veterinarian for more than 25 years, I’ve also seen my share of inherited orthopedic diseases in the furry family members I serve. Here are two fairly common joint diseases I think every new puppy owner should know about.


    Elbow dysplasia

    “Elbow what?!”

  • One of the trendy things to do is have your own vegetable garden. You can grow what you want, the varieties you like and know exactly how everything has been treated.

    Unfortunately, that doesn’t guarantee your success in the challenging climate of southeastern North Carolina.

  • Editor’s note: Fifth in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”


    In last week’s column, I talked about the importance of vegetables in the Mediterranean-style way of eating. It’s hard to talk about vegetables without adding their partner: fruits.

  • Things are slowly changing in the garden as January winds down and the days are noticeably longer. The warmer weather has pushed the Japanese flowering apricots into bloom in shades of red, white and pink. The hybrid plum Blireana won’t be far behind. 

    But, a look around the garden reminds of the ravages of the cold as the New Year got started.  Rose leaves are clinging lifelessly to the thorny canes, the boxwoods are bronzed and the Meyer lemon foliage hangs flaccidly waiting for a strong breeze to send it wafting to the ground. 

  • Many of the healthiest superfoods are blushing with color. Red, green, yellow, orange and blue signal vibrant phytonutrients, anti-aging antioxidants and vital vitamins. Skip with me down a colorful food pathway to healthier pets.


  • By Linda Arnold



     “When you tell yourself your story over and over, it almost becomes part of your DNA.”


    Do you feel stuck? In the doldrums? Can’t seem to get any traction?

    Well, you’re not alone. As we approach the end of January, it’s a common feeling with lots of people who have set goals for the New Year.

  • By John Nelson


  • Bacon seems to be everywhere these days. Over the years, it seems that bacon has gone from being a simple breakfast food that went with eggs and toast (and grits) to showing up all over the place.

    Blended into ice cream, wrapped around hot dogs or pizza, piled on hamburgers and other sandwiches and even deep-fried on a stick at state fairs, it seems like just about any food imaginable can be enhanced by bacon.