Today's Features

  • From the time I was a little girl, I have been intrigued with the multiple ways one can learn. Long ago, I read “Maida’s Little School,” a wonderful tale of innovative, intentional, experiential learning. The book described a learning process totally foreign to the educational system of the day. Likely, it remains known but rarely implemented today. There are efforts in the Montessori schools and probably other private places, but the vast majority of educational sites appear to be more deliberately institutional than they are daringly experiential.

  • Since I’ve been writing this food column, the most requested recipes have been ones using ingredients that we have in our pantries or fridge, and the fewer ingredients, the better.

    I have always liked to try different techniques and different types of foods on occasion, but we always come back to our comfort foods in the end. I have many old recipe books from libraries, churches, clubs and even relatives that I haven’t paid a lot of attention to until lately. The recipes below are from books from such organizations dating back to 1924.

  • The weather continues to dominate conversations of gardeners and non-gardeners alike. I’m not sure what happened to that prediction of “drier and warmer than normal” for this winter. At least we’re moving back into a more typical pattern.

    There’s nothing new to say about the cold weather and our plants. Yes, the sago palms and oleanders got bitten and will require some extra pruning. But, so far, there is no significant damage on other, well adapted trees and shrubs.

  • Ginny is the latest canine edition to the Ward family. As soon as she joined our pack, she became very attracted to the whole foods dished in her bowl. She’d been raised exclusively on kibble, and these fresh textures, tastes and smells were enticing. Carrots, apple slices, and cooked beans quickly became some of her favorites.

  • Editor’s note: Fourth in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”


    Eating a Mediterranean-style diet has been shown to reduce a person’s risk of chronic diseases. The basic concepts are to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, more fish, nuts, beans, seeds and olive oil similar to traditional diets of people who live in the Mediterranean region.

  • By Linda Arnold


    Flash bulletin: People decide whether they like you within seconds of meeting you.

    This is mostly an unconscious decision, yet there are certain things you can do to tip the balance in your favor.

    Let’s flip the table. When you first meet someone, what’s the first thing you try to decide? 

    Maybe it’s whether you have common interests or information to share. You might be wondering whether they could help you with your career or family challenge.

  • By John Nelson

  • Cindy Reading Graham snapped this photo Jan. 6 of an icicle that formed on the mouth of the giraffe at Ocean Isle Mini Golf on the Ocean Isle Beach island. “I thought it was so funny. Sunday it was a little longer. Monday it was completely gone.”

  • Leland Cultural Arts Center is kicking off the New Year and its fourth year of operation with winter-session classes and workshops, a student art show and a concert Friday, Jan. 19.

    The LCAC Winter 2018 Session opened this month with a multi-faceted lineup of classes and workshops including painting and drawing, basket weaving, ceramics/pottery, photography, stained glass, greeting card design, music and dance, theater, writing, exercise, fitness and yoga, Zumba and youth programs.

  • Renowned singer-songwriter Bob Lind remembers when he wrote his 1960s hit, “Elusive Butterfly,” more than a half-century ago.

    “I was living in a scummy little apartment on Downing Street (in Denver) and I wrote this song, stayed up all night writing it, and I didn’t feel it was any better than any of the other songs I was writing at the time,” he recalled during his induction into the Colorado Music Hall of Fame in 2013 alongside musical colleagues Judy Collins and The Serendipity Singers.