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Today's Features

  • By John Nelson

    Plant Columnist

     

    It’s a long time until Halloween, but here’s a spooky little plant.

    This is actually one of the most common wildflowers in eastern North America. It grows in all the eastern states, including Florida (maybe not the Keys), all the way out to the upper part of California and the Pacific Norwest, mostly skipping the southwestern states. (You could also find it in parts of South America and Asia.) It is fond of very shady forests.

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH — Creativity abounds at the annual North Carolina Oyster Festival.

    This year’s festival, scheduled for Oct. 18 and 19 in Ocean Isle Beach, will be no different.

    On Aug. 26, local artist Keith White and jewelry artisan Michael Abushakra once again unveiled their latest creations officially commemorating the 34th annual oyster festival.

  • Blending funk, soul, blues and Carolina beach music, The Holiday Band provides a festive audio backdrop year-round.

    The band’s been playing since 1991 when it launched in Burlington, playing 175-plus dates annually.

    The award-winning band consists of lead vocalist Doug Neese, saxophonist Bob Martin, and vocalist-guitarist-keyboardist-songwriter Mike Taylor, who penned the band’s 2003 No. 1 R&B hit, “I’m Man Enough,” which won the Song of the Year award at that year’s Carolina Beach Music Awards Show.

  •  Grits are a staple of the Southern breakfast. For those unfamiliar with them, grits are nothing more than coarsely ground, dried corn. If you grind it a little finer, you have the Italian staple, polenta…grind it finer yet, and you have corn meal.

    I’ve heard that some places like to combine grits with hominy, which is soaked in lye. Why would you want to soak food in lye, and then actually eat it?

  • Have you ever laughingly placed your hands in a defensive position in front of your face and declared, “That’s more information than I need to know!” Usually it happens when someone is offering personal, intimate, even graphic tidbits about health or hygiene. Embarrassment invades the space between speaker and listener and we’d rather not be party to the proffered data.

  • It seems that everyone wants to find that perfect food, the one that’s going to solve all their health problems. I really don’t think there is such a food, but there are two groups of goods that can help improve your health and reduce your risk of chronic disease. What are these foods?

    Yes, you guessed it: fruits and vegetables.

  • Grits are a staple of the Southern breakfast. For those unfamiliar with them, grits are nothing more than coarsely ground, dried corn. If you grind it a little finer, you have the Italian staple, polenta … grind it finer yet, and you have corn meal.

    I’ve heard that some places like to combine grits with hominy, which is soaked in lye. Why would you want to soak food in lye, and then actually eat it?

  • Audrey Nicole Smith of Supply is the proud parent of a son, Bladen Kyler Smith, born at 4:11 p.m. Aug. 18 at Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center weighing 5 pounds, 14 ounces and measuring 18½ inches long.
    Paternal grandparents are Lindberg and Carrie Lane Smith of Supply.
    Great-grandparents are the late Junior and Mina Smith of Shallotte and the late Bill and Rulane Lane of Supply.

  • John and Bessie Evans family reunion will be at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14, at United Vision Family Life Center, 2386 Al Clemmons Road SW in Shallotte.

    Come with a covered dish and a friend, expecting good fellowship, food and fun.

    For more information, call Cecilia at 754-6139 or Ilene at 754-4764.

  • Several hundred thousands times a year, people in England and Wales file complaints about piles of public dog poop. The costs of accommodating the digestive wastes of UK dogs during trots are estimated to run about $37 million per year. That’s a lot of poop bags, signs, trash bins and telephone calls. A recent scientific study set out to find out what’s up with people and their pet’s poop. Researchers identified five major poop personalities and hope to use this information to reduce all those piles and protests.