.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • BCC nursing class scores lowest in state; program changes made for next class

    SUPPLY—The registered nursing program implemented in 2005 at Brunswick Community College may have graduated 40 students in its first class, but only 23—58 percent— passed the NCLEX, the licensing test required for registered nurses.

  • Meal prices will increase for Brunswick County students next year

    Students attending Brunswick County Schools will have to dig out a few more coins for breakfast and lunch next year as meal prices are set to increase.

    The Brunswick County Board of Education voted Tuesday night to increase meal prices for the 2008-2009 school year.

    Breakfast in all schools will cost $1.10, an increase of 10 cents. Lunch in the elementary schools will cost $1.70, a 10-cent increase; middle school lunch will cost $1.85, a 15-cent increase; and lunch in the high schools will cost $2, a 20-cent increase.

  • Union Elementary teacher dyes hair pink after students pass math EOGs

    SHALLOTTE—When fifth grade Union Elementary School teacher Ginny Pridgen agreed to dye her hair pink if all of her 50 students passed the math portion of the End of Grade tests, she never thought she’d have to make due on her end of the bargain.

    Pridgen began preparing about 50 students for the math EOGs in March several months after the fifth-grade math teacher went on maternity leave.

  • Brunswick Soil and Water Conservation District recognizes educators and students

    The Brunswick Soil and Water Conservation District recognized educators, students and supporters of the District’s Conservation Education Program at its 2008 awards banquet on May 9 at Jennies Branch Church in Ocean Isle Beach. Black Light Ministry provided the evening’s entertainment.

    The 2008 Conservation Teacher of the Year award went to Sybil Mitchell-Simmons who has been active with Brunswick Soil & Water Conservation District’s educational programs for more than 10 years, participating in poster, speech, essay contests and the coastal and state envirothons.

  • BCC to offer continuing education classes

    The Continuing Education and Workforce Development Department at Brunswick Community College offers short-term programs and classes for self-improvement, cultural enrichment, and academic achievement geared towards adults seeking intellectual stimulation, community involvement and social interaction, according to Karen Ladley, the school’s public information officer.

  • Waccamaw School announces student awards

    The following students are being recognized for honor roll, citizenship, perfect attendance and principal’s awards for the third nine-week grading period.

    'A' Honor Roll

  • Supply Elementary School wins President's Volunteer Service Award

    Supply Elementary School has teamed with the White House to become a certifying organization for the President’s Volunteer Service Award, a national program recognizing Americans who have demonstrated a sustained commitment to volunteer service.

    The award was created by President George W. Bush in 2003 to give presidential recognition to individuals, families and groups who meet requirements for volunteer service, measured by the number of service hours performed during 12 months.

  • Board can't agree on lunch prices for next year

    It’s no surprise the cost of milk and bread are escalating, but the Brunswick County Board of Education can’t agree on how to handle the inflation.

    Earlier this month, the board tabled a request to raise school lunch prices after Tina Ward, director of child nutrition services, said the department was operating with a deficit of $107,919.49 as of Jan. 1. Ward suggested the increase to try and balance the budget and retain a three-month operating balance. The increase would also help offset grocery costs, which will rise to 8 percent next school year, Ward said.

  • New school name still undecided

    The Brunswick County Board of Education is still playing the name game.

    Board members discussed naming the district’s new middle school David R. Sandifer Middle School after the late county commissioner at last month’s committee meetings. While all seemed in favor of the name, opinions changed at the board’s monthly meeting May 6.

    Board member Ray Gilbert said he had received numerous calls from Cedar Grove community members and thought the board ought to get more community input before naming the school.

  • Community colleges to no longer admit illegal immigrants

    Based on advice from the Office of the Attorney General, the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) will no longer admit undocumented or illegal immigrants into curriculum degree programs.

    The NCCCS sought the help of the attorney general only a few months after a memorandum was issued in December 2007 mandating the 58 community colleges in the state to admit all undocumented individuals at an out-of-state tuition rate.