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Local News

  • Brunswick County improves in annual health rankings report

     Brunswick County continued its rise in the annual county health ratings, according to the latest County Health Rankings and Roadmaps report.

    Brunswick ranked 34th out of 100 counties in the report, moving up three spots from last year’s standing of 37th. The 2014 ranking is 13 standings lower than the 2012 of ranking of 47th in North Carolina.

  • Schools keep ‘Arts Alive’

     BOLIVIA — Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Edward Pruden said the arts are an extension of the core curriculum.

    So he was proud last Friday night when students from 11 of the district’s schools performed at the 14th Annual Arts Alive at Odell Williamson Auditorium on the campus of Brunswick Community College.

  • New Carolina Shores town administrator on the job

    CAROLINA SHORES — New Carolina Shores Town Administrator Jon Mendenhall started his first official day with the town Tuesday, April 1, with the usual get-acquainted routine.

    His first order of business was a 9 a.m. meeting with town staff at town hall.

    Mendenhall, 30, was hired by the town board of commissioners in February. He replaces former town administrator Mike Hargett, who resigned in November to become Brunswick County’s new planning and community development director.

  • House fires leave two families homeless

    Two house fires in two days have left two Brunswick County families homeless.

    The first fire broke out inside an occupied mobile home Sunday afternoon, March 30, at 7084 Old Georgetown Road.

    Sunset Beach Fire Chief Kevin Dempsey said the fire was reported at 4:11 p.m. at the single-wide home across the street from a Brunswick County EMS station.

    People inside the home were able to escape, but two puppies died. A third puppy was saved by rescue workers who administered oxygen.

  • Changes under way at Calabash Volunteer EMS

    CALABASH — Change is afoot at Calabash Volunteer Emergency Medical Services.

    One of the changes for the 31-year-old department occurred last October when EMT-1 Mark Powers was appointed chief, replacing Nick Todd who served as chief for a few months, department spokeswoman Amanda King said.

    There are other changes, as well.

    Precept is a newly implemented program for new members-in-training.

  • Bridge replacement near Leland results in road closure

    A bridge replacement project on N.C. 87 near Leland is scheduled to begin Monday, April 7, weather permitting.

    The project to replace the Hood Creek Bridge means N.C. 87 will be closing two miles north of Colon Mintz Road. Motorists can detour the closure by taking U.S. 17 to U.S. 74/76 back to N.C. 87 and vice versa.The North Carolina Department of Transportation advises motorists to use caution while traveling in the area and expect delays.

  • Defense moves to suppress evidence in Grissett murder trial

    BOLIVIA — A judge is considering a motion to suppress evidence in the trial of a man accused of beating an 86-year-old Longwood woman to death with his hands.

    Judge Wayland Sermons, a senior resident judge in the 2nd Judicial District for Beaufort, Hyde, Martin, Tyrell and Washington counties, is presiding over the trial of Richard Hugh Grissett in Brunswick County Criminal Superior Court, which began Monday, March 31. The trial is expected to last about two weeks.

  • Dosher Hospital begins patient care unit renovation

    Dosher Memorial Hospital, 924 N. Howe St. in Southport, has begun the major renovation of its medical/surgical Inpatient Care Unit (ICU).

  • BEMC awards $35,550 in community grants

    Twenty-four projects were selected from a field of nearly 50 applicants to receive funding for their programs from Brunswick Electric Membership Corp.’s Community Grant program. This year’s grants total was $35,550 for projects to be implemented in Brunswick and Columbus counties.

  • Dosher CEO sports beard in ‘Hair for Hope’ challenge

    Sometimes the best ideas are not planned. They just happen in a moment of inspiration. Such was the case with the beard that now occupies the face of Tom Siemers, CEO of Dosher Memorial Hospital.

    It all began one morning in mid-February when Siemers accidentally cut himself shaving. Several days later, the cut got infected and, as the infection grew worse, Siemers paid a visit to Dosher’s emergency department, where he was treated and told he couldn’t shave for at least two weeks.