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Local News

  • Fix A Friend marks 4,000th surgery with Aug. 29 party

    Fix A Friend Spay Neuter Clinic in Winnabow recently performed its 4,000th spay/neuter surgery in less than a year.

    It is celebrating this huge milestone at a one-year anniversary party, “Grab and Growl,” at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 29 at the clinic at 6033 Ocean Highway West in Winnabow.

    Thanks to Fix A Friend, which opened Aug. 26, 2013, it’s estimated at least a million fewer unwanted kittens will be born in southeastern North Carolina. And that’s the estimated result from just six weeks of surgeries.

  • Carolina Shores relays improved communications

    CAROLINA SHORES — The town is in the process of implementing modes of improving communications with residents.

    Town administrator Jon Mendenhall said those efforts are being conducted by way of the town website, www.carolinashoresnc.com.

  • Late-night fire heavily damages Calabash restaurant

    The Calabash Fire Department and several mutual-aid companies battled a blaze that broke out late Saturday night at a Calabash restaurant.

    Coleman’s Restaurant at 9931 Nance St. sustained heavy damages to its roof and front portion during the fire reported at 11:36 p.m. Aug. 16.

    Arriving units found smoke pouring from the roof of the one-story structure, and flames broke through shortly thereafter, according to fire department spokeswoman Honey Shore. Firefighters battled the blaze for just over an hour before bringing it under control.

  • Governor signs new charter schools law

     Gov. Pat McCrory signed a bill into law Aug. 6 that requires charter schools to disclose the names of employees and salary information.

    The action follows months of charter school scrutiny as Roger Bacon Academy (RBA), which operates two charter schools in Brunswick County, failed to comply with several public records requests from local media outlets, an infraction punishable by charter revocation.

  • Superintendent upholds school’s decision to keep book

     Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Edward Pruden upheld Cedar Grove Middle School’s decision to keep a controversial novel on the shelves of its libraries.

    Frankie Wood, 72, appealed the school’s decision to keep “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” as part of the eighth-grade curriculum June 30.

    Wood was scheduled to speak at the board of education’s monthly meeting Aug. 5, but chose not to address the board because she said she hadn’t received Pruden’s response.

  • Gang prevention program funded by Board of Education

     Local law enforcement and education officials left an Aug. 5 Brunswick County Board of Education meeting feeling great about G.R.E.A.T.

    Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Maj. Brian Sanders made a presentation to the board about the county’s Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) program, an evidence-based and effective gang and violence prevention program built around school-based, law enforcement officer-instructed classroom curricula.

  • Trial date set for man accused of rape while out on bond

     The trial date for an Ash man accused of rape and kidnapping while out on bail has been set for Sept. 17 in Brunswick County Superior Court.

    Richard Teremaine Gore, 30, of 5246 Marlow Road, was out of jail on $50,000 bail in January when he broke the straps of his court-ordered GPS tracking device and drove to Little River, S.C., Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office investigators said.

  • Area roads flood after heavy rainfall

     The Cape Fear Region has experienced a 212 percent increase in rainfall during a three-week stretch that’s caused significant problems on Brunswick County roads.

    National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Bacon said this summer, especially lately, has seen an uncharacteristic amount of cold fronts.

  • BCC home to marine biotechnology program

     You can visit community colleges all across the Tar Heel State but you’ll only find one that offers a marine biotechnology program. And that college is right in your backyard.

    Brunswick Community College last month announced the launch of its marine biotechnology program, becoming the first community college in the state to offer such a program.

    The new program, an Associate in Applied Science in marine biotechnology, will be offered beginning in the fall semester, starting Monday, Aug. 18.

  • Doctors search for ways to treat patients’ pain

     BOLIVIA — Brunswick County’s prescription painkiller problem emerged before community leaders welcomed Fred Brason, a Wilkes County native, to discuss Project Lazarus in late June.

    Project Lazarus is a secular public health nonprofit established in 2008 in response to extremely high drug overdose death rates in Wilkes County, which was four times higher than the state average at the time.