Local News

  • Building fees mulled in Calabash

    CALABASH—Town commissioners have begun taking a closer look at charging more equitable building-permit fees.

    Scrutiny came at a specially called workshop and meeting Aug. 19 to review and revise the town’s current fee schedule, including provisions for determining building permit fees for multi-unit structures.

    The board has scheduled a public hearing for revisions to the fee schedule at its next monthly meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 14.

  • Carolina Shores leaders rebuked for suspending banner law

    CAROLINA SHORES—The town planning and zoning board has taken town commissioners to task for suspending an ordinance prohibiting banners and flags at local businesses.

    Jim Parsch, chairman of the Carolina Shores Planning and Zoning Board, read a statement at his board’s Aug. 18 meeting asking commissioners to reinstate the law. On Aug. 5, commissioners approved a resolution suspending enforcement of the ordinance until the economy improves.

  • Nuke plant officials attempt to ease neighbors’ minds about noise, water

    SOUTHPORT—Progress Energy’s Brunswick Nuclear Plant has changed its drill procedures to allow for better emergency response, is ready to move ahead with its dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and has installed silencers on all security guard guns to avoid noise pollution from the on-site firing range.

    Those were some of the topics the plant’s site vice president addressed at last Thursday’s community meeting, during which a number of local residents expressed their concerns about pollution and radiation.

  • Oyster Festival art depicts classic local roast

    The artist of the 30th annual North Carolina Oyster Festival official artwork says this year’s piece depicts what local oyster roasts looked like years ago.

    Brunswick Beacon graphic artist Keith White and Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith unveiled the official artwork for the 30th annual North Carolina Oyster Festival during an event on Wednesday, Aug. 25. 

    White, a Shallotte native, has been chosen as the official artist for the festival for the second consecutive year.

  • Career technical education programs aims to reduce dropouts

    School officials are excited to integrate vocational arts into the daily curriculum at Brunswick County Academy. They believe it will help reduce the dropout rate and provide students additional opportunities to be successful.

    With the help of a $1.9 million federal School Improvement Grant, a new career technical education (CTE) program will be implemented at Brunswick County Academy (BCA) this fall, which will introduce students to three areas of vocational arts.

  • Manufactured home sellers seeing business pick up after 2009 ‘disaster’

    Solid oak cabinets, walk-in closets and simulated or solid surface countertops are luxuries you might not expect from a manufactured home, but led by customer requests, those are they types of amenities available in today’s market.

    And homebuyers are responding.

    Local manufactured home sales companies are reporting better business during the first half of 2010 than all of 2009, but difficulty obtaining mortgage loans remains an issue for buyers.

  • Upcoming pageant promotes community involvement

    It’s not an “as seen on TV” beauty pageant.

    Little girls are told not to wear make-up. Flippers, which are fake teeth used to fill in gaps caused by missing teeth, and hairpieces are not allowed. Pageant director Holly Shepard said little girls “should look like little girls.”

    “Pageants don’t have a good name, and I’m trying to let everybody know it’s not what you see on TV,” she said.

  • African teachers travel overseas for training with local resident

    Teachers Loukia Dokakis and Afrothiti Dokakis are committed to providing their students with the best possible education.

    So committed, in fact, the teachers flew from Botswana, Africa, to Brunswick County last week for a training session with a local education consultant. It marked their second trip to the U.S. for educational training in the past year.

    After hitting the 20-year mark in her teaching career, Loukia Dokakis began to wonder if she had enough motivation to continue teaching.

  • Schools successfully show growth, continue to work toward proficiency

    BOLIVIA—If a school fails to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for the school year, it does not mean it is a failing school, Bob Grimes, director of secondary education for Brunswick County Schools, said.

    “We try hard to educate the public and help them understand, but still there’s the perception that that school is a failing school,” he said.

  • Boater rescued after saving drowning man

    A South Carolina boater who works in Brunswick County had a close call trying to save a North Carolina man from drowning Saturday.

    C.P. Parker, 52, who works as a superintendent for Blue Sky Building of Shallotte, was returning with his wife and daughter from fishing in their boat on Waties Island last Saturday afternoon when they heard cries for help.