Local News

  • First sea turtle nest hatching on Ocean Isle Beach

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—The first sea turtle nest of the 2010 season is hatching on Ocean Isle Beach.

    The nest, near the Concord Street beach access, began hatching Sunday night, Gloria Hillenburg, coordinator of the Ocean Isle Beach Turtle Patrol, said. Baby loggerhead sea turtles emerged about 8:30 p.m. Sunday, and were still hatching as of Tuesday afternoon. Hillenburg said 70 turtles had left the nest so far.

  • Tubb named CTE director of the year by state association

    As director of Brunswick County Schools’ career technical education (CTE) program, Les Tubb said he’s the person who takes the blame whenever things don’t go well.

    When things go well, he prefers to pass the credit on to his staff.

    And even after being named the North Carolina Career Technical Education Administrator of the Year by the North Carolina Association of Career and Technical Education during the state conference Monday, Tubb took the opportunity to once again highlight his staff and the program’s accomplishments.

  • Brunswick Community College tuition increases 13 percent

    BOLIVIA—Tuition for the fall 2010 semester at Brunswick Community College has increased $6.50 per credit hour for North Carolina residents—a 13 percent increase compared to this time last year.

    Non-North Carolina residents will pay an extra $7.20 per credit hour for the 2010 fall semester. In-state residents paid $50 per credit hour in fall 2009.

    Liz McClean, director of marketing for BCC, said all tuition increases are determined by the state.

  • Deficit in school budget ‘not as bad’ as anticipated

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County school officials think the final budget for the 2010-2011 fiscal year will not be as bad as anticipated.

    The district’s preliminary budget included about $4 million in state reductions, which included a discretionary reduction and another estimated three percent reduction. Freyja Cahill, executive finance officer, said the state opted to use lottery money to help save teacher jobs throughout the state, and the three percent reduction is not set to take place this fiscal year.

  • Local officials say they'll continue push for terminal groins

    Mayor Debbie Smith said the east end of Ocean Isle Beach “has had a problem on and off for many years,” and more than a dozen homes have been relocated due to continual erosion of the beach strand. She can only recall one that was truly lost due to erosion.

    “It gradually went away,” she said.

    To help save the east end and beaches along the coast in similar situations, Smith has been vocal in supporting Senate Bill 832, which would allow currently banned terminal groins from being built in inlets to help combat erosion.

  • Towns, residents struggle with erosion, looking for solutions

    Thirteen years ago, Eli Gold and his wife, Claudette, had a plan. They purchased the last house on East Third Street in Ocean Isle Beach and planned to retire there full-time once their daughter went to college.

    They never dreamed their retirement plan would be at risk of one day being swallowed by the sea.

    Thirteen years ago, the Golds’ house was behind four other houses. Third Street extended beyond their property line, and the town’s infrastructure was intact.

    Over the years, “the erosion eventually won,” Eli Gold said.

  • Barber snippy about forced sign removal

    SUNSET BEACH—For the past year and a half, barber Richard Candlemo said he was allowed to have a directional sign to his shop in the Seaside business complex.

    That all changed last week when the town told him the sign was a violation and he had to remove it.

    Last week, the owner of Richard’s Barber Shop was warned by the town building department he would be fined $50 a day if he didn’t remove the sign from his parking space at the complex.

  • Sunset Beach: No segue for Segways unless on 25 mph street

    SUNSET BEACH—Judy Panarello tried to bring Segways to town to give people a different segue into Sunset Beach.

    But town rules placed limitations on the electric two-wheelers, so Panarello moved her Segway tours a little farther south to Little River, S.C.

    For starters, Segways are only allowed on streets with speed limits not exceeding 25 miles per hour.

    Panarello, a partner with Myrtle Beach Segway, says she also isn’t allowed to rent the vehicles within town limits.

  • New Hope Clinic grand opening in Boiling Spring Lakes

    BOILING SPRING LAKES—Welcoming visitors to New Hope Clinic’s new 4,000-square-foot facility, nursing coordinator Barbara Lidoski said it was a far cry from the nonprofit’s previous clinic housed at two rented storage offices on N.C. 211.

    “It was tiny, tiny, tiny,” Lidoski said Saturday of the old clinic during grand opening festivities of the new facility at 201 West Boiling Spring Road.

  • Man makes pitch for ditch in Carolina Shores

    CAROLINA SHORES—John Tutchton brought pictures of an overgrown ditch to a recent town meeting, pictures nobody clamored to see.

    The Village at Calabash resident asked who is responsible for cleaning the tree- and brush-choked gully that extends from the neighborhood’s entrance to the boundaries of the former Calabash Golf Links course.

    Town commissioner Tom Puls responded the community’s POA owns the ditch.

    “The town does not,” he said.