Local News

  • Proposed Holden Beach budget has no tax or fee increases

    Holden Beach commissioners seemed pleased town manager David Hewett’s proposed $11.9 million budget for the next fiscal year has no tax increases and no fee increases.

    But they spent the most time at Tuesday’s budget workshop arguing whether the town should add a full-time recreation director.

    Commissioners Don Glander, Sandy Miller and Sheila Young voiced opposition to adding a position, citing it’s a bad time because of the economy.

  • Soles introduces bill to split 13th Prosecutorial District

    Lame duck state Sen. R.C. Soles, D-Columbus, isn’t letting his waning months in the state Senate prevent him from introducing controversial legislation in the Senate—even if it’s a “non-controversial” short session.

    On Thursday, May 20, Soles introduced Senate Bill 1340, which divides the 13th Prosecutorial District into District 13A—Bladen and Columbus counties—and 13B—Brunswick County.

  • Soles, Gore sound off on bill to amend DA’s pension

    Outgoing district attorney Rex Gore said he asked State Sen. R.C. Soles Jr., D-Columbus, to amend the effective date of a bill Soles introduced in the state Senate, which, in its original language, would allow Gore to retire with full benefits.

    Senate Bill 1341, introduced by Soles last week, and amended May 24, aims to amend the judicial retirement system.

    Soles said it was Gore that brought to his attention the need to amend the judicial retirement system but said he did not introduce the bill to benefit Gore or anyone else.

  • Kitten trapped? It's Carolina Shores mayor to the rescue

    CAROLINA SHORES—When Edie Turner returned home one recent Sunday night, she heard a strange sound coming from her car.

    It sounded just like a kitten mewing.

    She thought she’d heard it earlier that evening when she was in the parking lot at a restaurant in Little River, S.C., then another meow while she was driving back.

  • More fines imposed on Ash mom trying to get custody of sons

    Amy Smith’s optimism she will soon get her sons back soured last week after a Canadian judge imposed more fines against her.

    Even though the case is scheduled to be heard June 18 under the Hague Treaty, an international child-abduction law, an Ontario judge last week fined Smith $8,528.63 in “full in indemnity costs.”

  • Calabash artist wins 'best of show' for shrimp boat painting


    Artist Marie Kasper’s painting of Calabash shrimp boats is “best of show” winner in the Waterway Art Association’s 19th Annual Art Exhibition now under way through Memorial Day.

    This past Monday, Kasper’s acrylic painting, “Calabash Village Shrimp Boats,” also became a purchase award when it was bought by Carolina Bluewater Construction.

  • Carolina Shores assistant's firing not valid, attorney says

    CAROLINA SHORES—Based on information board members have given a Beacon reporter, a North Carolina press attorney believes the town violated open meetings law when it fired its assistant town administrator.

    By failing to approve the termination of Amanda Chestnut in open session, commissioners took illegal and improper action, and therefore it’s not valid, said NCPA attorney Amanda Martin.

  • TDA hears $1 million budget proposal; public hearing June 22

    Members of the Brunswick County Tourism Development Authority have received a $1 million budget proposal for 2010-2011 and plan to vote on the “very conservative” spending plan at their June 22 meeting.

    At Tuesday’s regular authority meeting, TDA executive director Mitzi York and Todd Smith of Smith Advertising, the authority’s contracted ad agency, presented a “strategic overview” of the proposal.

  • School officials plan to identify more AIG students next year

    While 8 percent of Brunswick County students are eligible for the district’s Academically or Intellectually Gifted (AIG) Program, school officials believe the actual number is much higher.

    Connie Enis, curriculum coordinator for Brunswick County Schools, said identifying eligible students will be a major focus within the next year “so we can try to be as diverse as possible with our diverse student populations in our county.”

  • CIPP measures yearly progress of Exceptional Children

    The Exceptional Children (EC) program is monitored by state officials, who examine 15 quality indicators yearly.

    “They set targets for districts to attain, and districts must make sure they make progress to meet goals,” Jessica Swencki, director of Brunswick County Schools’ EC program, said.