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Local News

  • State Board votes to allow undocumented immigrants into community colleges

    Community colleges throughout North Carolina may soon be able to admit undocumented immigrants, the State Board of Community Colleges has announced.

    The board recently voted 16 to 1 to adopt a policy that would allow undocumented immigrants to apply for and attend community colleges. Applicants must have graduated from a United States high school and will be required to pay out-of-state tuition, which equals $7,700 per academic year.

    The ruling also states no undocumented immigrant may displace a North Carolina or United States resident from any class or program.

  • Entertainment will be plenty at this year’s Intercultural Festival

    Performers representing countries and cultures around the world will share their talents at this year’s Brunswick County Intercultural Festival, which will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4, at Brunswick Community College.

    Lydia Moore Coyner, the performing arts chairperson and the event’s mistress of ceremonies, has been in charge of bringing acts to the festival since 2004. Starting with basic Internet searches, the performance lineup has evolved into a variety of favorites from years past as well as local groups.

  • Students practice for Special Olympics bowling tournament

    SHALLOTTE—Exceptional Children (EC) of all abilities are taking to the bowling lanes as part of a five-week Special Olympics bowling tournament.

    EC Students are bused from Brunswick County Schools throughout the county to Planet Fun once a week for four weeks of bowling practice. The fifth week will be a tournament where they will compete against each other.

    Steve Goodwin, county coordinator for Special Olympics, said the tournament has been a fixture of Brunswick County Parks and Recreation for many years, and more students participate each year.

  • West Brunswick overcrowded, determined to succeed

    SHALLOTTE—West Brunswick High School may be the largest and most crowded high school in the county, but Principal George Kelley isn’t afraid of a challenge.

    “I just don’t think we have any excuses not to be successful here,” he said. “We’re headed in the right direction, our scores are indicating that.”

  • West Brunswick student builds playground shelter as Eagle Scout service project

    Seventeen-year-old Daniel Hagan has completed the requirements to become an Eagle Scout and gave back to his childhood school in the process.

    For his service project, Hagan decided to build a shelter area at Waccamaw School's playground. A former Waccamaw student, Hagan said the school is his "favorite place on Earth," and wanted to do give back to the place he received so much.

    "It has been a pleasure and an honor planning and constructing this shelter for the past year," he said during a dedication ceremony Wednesday evening.

  • Suspect fires shot at sheriff’s deputies; deputy fires back

    SHALLOTTE—An undercover drug buy went awry when a man from whom drug agents were attempting to purchase drugs shot at a van carrying three sheriff’s deputies.

    Just before 1 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 19, drug agents arrived at the intersection of Tryon Road and McMilly Road in Shallotte, according to a sheriff’s office incident report. When an undercover drug agent attempted to make a controlled narcotics buy, sheriff’s office officials say Demontray Hill allegedly pulled out a shotgun and fired one shot at the sheriff’s office van.

  • Coast Guard sets hearing on Ocean Isle parasail accident

    The U.S. Coast Guard has scheduled a formal hearing for Sept. 23-25 to receive testimonies about the fatal parasailing accident Aug. 28 on Ocean Isle Beach, which resulted in the deaths of two vacationing women.

    The hearing is set for 9 a.m.-5 p.m. each day at the New Hanover County Courthouse, courtroom 402.

  • Teams get ready to S-P-E-L-L in literacy council bee Thursday

    Spelling teams will once again compete Thursday night in Brunswick County Literacy Council’s 20th annual spelling bee, set for 7 p.m. at Brunswick Community College.

    As of press deadline Tuesday, 13 teams had signed on for this year’s spelling contest. For the first time it will be in the Virginia Williamson Event Center in Odell Williamson Auditorium. More teams may be added this week for the annual “contest against the dictionary,” spelling bee chairman Matt Ernst said.

  • Technology, changing habits, economy mean changes for tourism promotion

    Summer tourist season in Brunswick County used to be easy to predict: Families from other parts of the state loaded up their station wagons beginning in June and drove a few hours to spend a week on the beach.

    With the development boom came more opportunities for tourism, and in 1996, the state legislature approved an occupancy tax to be used specifically for tourism promotion. Brunswick County formed the Tourism Development Authority to plan how to use the money.

  • Calabash narrows down administrative candidates to six interviews this week

    CALABASH—Town commissioners were slated to interview six people this week for Calabash’s vacant town administrator position.

    An “emergency” four-hour meeting was called Monday afternoon so the board could go into closed session to interview three candidates.

    The meeting was called on an emergency basis. Because of “human error,” proper 48-hour notice wasn’t given, town administrator Kelley Southward and Mayor Anthony Clemmons noted in e-mailed memos sent out Monday morning.