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Local News

  • South Carolina woman arrested for trafficking opium, striking officer's vehicle

    A South Carolina woman was arrested last week for multiple drug charges and for driving her car into a car driven by undercover narcotics officers.

    Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Drug Enforcement Unit Sgt. Steve Lanier said drug agents arrested Melissa Russelletta Skeeter, 36, of 100 Apt. 4 Christy Way, Little River, S.C., after a brief chase, during which she allegedly drove her car into a car driven by undercover drug agents. Skeeter was arrested as she attempted to cross the state line into Horry County, S.C., Lanier said.

  • Sudan Daredevils named best overall unit, mini-car winners

    They don’t do it for the glory; they do it for the kids.

    But recently, members of the Sudan Daredevils of the South Brunswick Islands Shrine Club in Shallotte brought home the glory when they won two awards at the South Atlantic Shrine Association’s (SASA) meeting in Virginia Beach. Va.

    The unit won first place in the minicar division and best overall unit, beating numerous other units for the top award.

  • Contract OK'd for Carolina Shores assistant

    CAROLINA SHORES—Town commissioners have approved a two-year contract for assistant town manager Amanda Chestnut.

    But Mayor Stephen Selby declined to sign the contract until a form-of-government referendum is decided by voters Nov. 3.

    Town staff would not release a copy of Chestnut's contract Tuesday. Chestnut also declined to answer a reporter's questions or take a phone call.

    The vote for the controversial contract was 4-1, with commissioner Joseph Przywara casting the only “nay” vote.

  • Forms of government detailed in Carolina Shores

    CAROLINA SHORES—It isn't meant for a mayor to left out of a municipal governing body, an official with the Cape Fear Council of Governments said at a specially called meeting last week.

    “The mayor and commissioners are the governing body,” Chris May, executive director of the Cape Fear Council of Governments, said at the Oct. 8 meeting to explain differences between mayor-council and council-manager forms of government.

    And a town administrator or town manager has the “exact same powers” via North Carolina statute, May said.

  • Carolina Shores agrees to release closed-session minutes; mass-mailing idea fails

    CAROLINA SHORES—Town commissioners have agreed to release the town’s closed-session minutes following a resolution posed at their monthly meeting Oct. 8.

    Town commissioner Joseph Przywara proposed the resolution “since the town has never opened up any closed-meeting minutes.”

    Citing state statute, he said those minutes over the past nine years should be opened as long as they no longer frustrate the purpose for the closed session.

  • Parade of Homes is Oct. 16-18, 23-25

    Thirty-one homes across the county, ranging in price from $139,000 to more than $1 million, will be ready for their “grand tours” this weekend and next weekend during the Brunswick County Parade of Homes.

    Descriptions and addresses for the homes are available in the Parade of Homes magazine, which are at a number of locations throughout the county including all BB&T banks, The Brunswick Beacon and Food Lion supermarkets. The information includes driving directions and maps.

  • Southport's Margaret Harper dies at 92

    Southport native, community leader, faithful churchgoer and newspaperwoman, Margaret Taylor Harper, 92, of Southport, died Oct. 11, at Duke University Medical Center of complications following a stroke.

    She’s remembered as an active part of her church, her community and North Carolina. She even ran for lieutenant governor twice.

    Harper was born Feb. 17, 1917, in Southport, a daughter of Charles Edward and Jessie Stevens Taylor.

  • Economic forecasters predict 4 percent growth in region

    Economic forecasters are predicting a 4 percent economic growth in Brunswick, New Hanover and Pender counties during 2010, more than the growth predicted for the state of North Carolina (1.5 percent) and the nation (2.1 percent).

    Locally, businesspeople and officials say they agree with the forecast and are optimistic about the future.

  • Local municipalities receive Powell Bill funds

    Seventeen of Brunswick County’s 19 municipalities recently received Powell Bill funding through the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

    The towns of St. James and Varnamtown were the only Brunswick municipalities not to receive funding in this year’s allocation, which totaled $132 million for 507 municipalities across the state, according to NCDOT.

  • Local director says VA facility much needed for county’s 15,000 veterans

    The Veterans Affairs Office of the Actuary estimates 12,656 veterans live in Brunswick County. But Anita Hartsell, Brunswick County’s Director of Veterans Services, said the number of veterans living in the county is closer to 15,000—and that number is on the rise.

    At their last meeting, Brunswick County Commissioners unanimously endorsed converting Brunswick Community Hospital to a VA facility once the hospital relocates to its new facility currently under construction.